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Fair-Play Proposal Gets No Support

Published: August 12, 2003 (Issue # 892)


The highest profile candidate for the post of governor of St. Petersburg called over the weekend for all candidates to avoid the use of dirty tricks during the upcoming campaign - and promptly found herself accused of exactly what she said she wanted to avoid.

Valentina Matviyenko, the presidential representative to the Northwest Region, circulated a petition to other candidates asking them to sign a pledge not to engage in unfair campaigning.

"We, the undersigned, are obliged not to ... bribe voters; publish anonymous advertising materials not paid for by the candidate's election funds; distribute fake advertisements or organize antisocial actions in other candidates' names; distribute false, insulting or discrediting rumors, distribute fake accusations via the Internet or other non-official information sources ...," read the document, which was sent out to local media outlets by Matviyenko's press service on Monday.

Monday afternoon, the petition still had just one signature - Matviyenko's.

Representatives of other candidates called the petition a dishonest move on Matviyenko's part.

"[Matviyenko] sent us a letter on Friday asking us to help with work on a petition, but the letter had no contact numbers," Yabloko party representative Olga Pokrovskaya, who works the headquarters of Mikhail Amosov, the Yabloko candidate for the elections, said in a telephone interview on Monday. "We would be happy to work on such a petition, but it appeared in the media on Monday with no consultation."

"As one of my colleagues said, it's as though you asked a pack of wolves to become vegetarians," she said, adding that the document failed to cover one important area.

"Nothing is said about guaranteeing all candidates equal media access, one of the main ways to avoid dirty tricks," Pokrovskaya said.

Speculation has been rife in St. Petersburg that the Kremlin is trying to gag local media outlets to make it easier for Matviyenko to win the race for governor. At the end of June, the new management of local television channel St. Petersburg Television, or TRK, shut down a range of analytical programs on local politics. The channel's new boss formerly worked at pro-Kremlin television channel Rossiya.

"When I saw this petition, I didn't think about whether or not I'd sign it - I was thinking why this initiative came from this specific source," gubernatorial candidate and Legislative Assembly lawmaker Konstantin Sukhenko said in a telephone interview on Monday.

"I have certain doubts about the integrity of this initiative," he said. "This is a public-relations move, and I'm not going to be part of someone else's public-relations campaign."

Tatyana Dorutina, head of the St. Petersburg League of Voters, said the petition had put all the candidates in a very uncomfortable position.

"On the one hand, anyone who doesn't sign it will have to explain why they are against it," Dorutina said in a telephone interview on Monday. "This move would obviously reinforce [Matviyenko's] position."

"On the other hand, it looks like none of the candidates is interested in making contact with the voters," she said. "This is because all the candidates seem to think that votes will come to them of their own accord, and this is a very bad sign."

The gubernatorial elections are slated for Sept. 21, with 11 candidates on the ballot sheet. The elections were due to be held in May next year, but were moved to September after President Vladimir Putin appointed former governor Vladimir Yakovlev to work in the federal government as deputy prime minister in charge of communal-services reform.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café — 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



Learn everything you always wanted to know about wine, and perhaps a bit more, at the Le Nez du Vin seminar for wine lovers. Held at the WineJet Sommelier School, 100 Bolshoy Prospekt Petrograd Side, at 7:30 p.m., the event will cover wine production, the basics of wine tasting, the concept of terroir and the various countries where wine is produced. Tickets are 750 rubles and include a wine tasting. Register by calling +7 921 744 6264.



Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous’ in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of ‘Repulsion’ at 7 p.m. and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy ‘The Tenant,’ the cult comedy ‘The Fearless Vampire Killers’ and ‘Cul-de-sac’ among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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