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No Wrong Way to Swing Bat

Published: October 31, 2003 (Issue # 915)



  • A "server" tossing up the ball for the waiting batter at the Belgorod championships.
    Photo: Vladimir Filonov / The St. Petersburg Times

BELGOROD, Central Russia - Boston Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez might not chalk up so many strikeouts if he were forced to stand next to the hitter and gently toss the ball straight up, and Giants slugger Barry Bonds might not be threatening baseball's career home run record if he had to start his swing with the bat between his legs.

But these are the pitching and hitting techniques of Russian lapta, a game that some claim was the inspiration for America's national pastime, and since Sunday, 15 teams - 10 boys' and five girls' squads - have been duking it out in this traditional stick-and-ball game at the Russian College Lapta Championship.

Lapta is an ancient Russian sport - wooden bats and leather balls dating back to the 14th century have been discovered in Veliky Novgorod, according to the Russian Lapta Federation - and though historians generally credit New York bank teller Alexander Cartwright with inventing baseball in 1845, lapta fanatics like to point out Russia's contribution to the Grand Old Game.

"Our theory is that Russian immigrants or Jews from Odessa brought lapta to America, and baseball evolved from there," said Sergei Fokin, the federation's vice president. "Lapta is a much older game, and there are so many similar concepts: tagging runners out, hitting and catching fly balls, for example."

An explanation of lapta can be as disorienting to the uninitiated as an explanation of cricket to an American or baseball to a non-American.

Here are some of the gory details: The game is played on a field roughly half the size of a soccer pitch with five strategically placed defensemen and one "server." The server stands next to the batter on the endline and tosses a tennis ball straight up with a straight arm for him to hit with a wooden bat.

The hitting team has a six-man batting rotation. The batter has two tries to hit the ball over a 10-meter line, but even if he doesn't, he moves over to the left of the batting circle and becomes a runner.

The ensuing batters try to hit the ball so that the runner - or runners -on the endline can run to the other end of the field and back, earning two points when he returns to his point of departure. But his path is made difficult by the defensemen, who retrieve the ball and try to plunk the runner before he scores. The defense moves to offense when they successfully "tag" a runner and make it back to the endline without being re-tagged.

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Friday, Apr. 18


Teachers and students alike shouldn’t miss the opportunity to establish lasting contacts with Russian and foreign institutions during the 21st Education and Career Fair at LenExpo, beginning today and finishing tomorrow. Learn more about education in Russia and connect with your fellow scholars.


The Tromso International Film Festival, Norway’s largest, brings a short festival to St. Petersburg for one day only during Scandinavian Oddities, starting at 7 p.m. today at Rodina Cinema Center. Tickets for the event are 100 rubles ($2.80).


Sunday, Apr. 20


Celebrate Easter at Pavlovsk during the Easter Fair that begins today and continues through next Sunday. Visitors will have the chance to paint Easter eggs and children can take part in games as well as help decorate a tree in honor of Christianity’s holiest day.


Today is one of the final days to see the exhibit Cacti — Children of the Sun at the Peter the Great Botanical Garden. Starting Apr. 17, budding botanists will marvel at the variety and beauty of the desert’s most iconic plant.


Monday, Apr. 21


Improve your grasp of Neruda, Bolano and Marquez at TrueDA’s Beginners Spanish Lesson this evening at their location on the Petrograd Side. An experienced teacher will be on hand to help all attendees better understand the intricacies of the language and improve their accent.


Tuesday, Apr. 22


SPIBA’s Breakfast with the Director event series continues as the association welcomes Andrei Barannikov, general director of SPN Communications, to the Anna Pavlova Hall of the Angleterre Hotel this morning at 9 a.m. Attendees must confirm their participation by Apr. 21.


The AmCham Environment, Health and Safety Committee Meeting is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. this morning in the their St. Petersburg office.