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Are North Korean Missiles Guided by Russia's Hands?

Published: September 8, 2000 (Issue # 601)


AT the moment, some of the world's leading experts on missile technology are intensively studying an explosive theory about North Korea's infamous missiles.

It is a hypothesis with far-reaching ramifications for American diplomacy, but also one that sounds almost like a Hollywood movie script.

It goes like this: The North Korean missiles - the ones that frightened Japan and prompted the United States to begin thinking seriously about missile-defense systems - aren't really North Korean at all. They're Russian, secretly built with Russian components and the active and ongoing help of some errant Russian scientists inside North Korea.

Under this theory (and here's the Hollywood plot), a rogue team of Russian missile scientists - thrown out of work after the collapse of the Soviet Union - may have moved to North Korea. And there, for profit or glory or both, they have directed the North Korean program - with the North Koreans themselves doing little more than putting the pieces together.

The missile experts who have been gathering evidence to support this theory phrase it in much drier terms, of course.

"It must be concluded that various Russian companies - not necessarily the Russian government - and North Korean authorities are closely cooperating in the missile programs," wrote German missile-technology specialist Dr. Robert H. Schmucker in a recent paper.

"From these [Russian] institutions, North Korea received everything necessary to manufacture or assemble missiles. ... The future of North Korea's work and success depends completely on the Russian involvement."

Timothy McCarthy, senior analyst at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, says he has been quietly examining for months the possibility that some Russians are continuing to provide key components for the North Korean missiles.

There is no evidence to suggest that the Russian government has been involved. Russian President Vladimir Putin visited Pyongyang last July and suggested afterward that North Korea might be willing to abandon missile development if other nations would launch North Korean satellites.

Still, if even individual Russian scientists or factories were privately helping to produce the North Korean missiles, there would be important implications for U.S. foreign policy.

"If the North Korean program isn't viable without Russian components, then you'd have to look at Russia, not North Korea, for the solution to the problem," McCarthy said.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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