Friday, November 28, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Plan for Tunnel to Sakhalin Unveiled

Published: November 28, 2000 (Issue # 624)


MOSCOW - The Russian government is talking of reviving a grandiose Stalin-era project to build a 10-kilometer tunnel under the Pacific Ocean to connect the mainland to the island of Sakhalin and then adding a 40-kilometer bridge over the ocean to connect Sakhalin to Japan.

Officials from President Vladimir Putin on down have been talking up the project and suggest it could be under way by the end of next year.

They are doing so despite an unusually sour Japanese response to the idea, including Japan's firm insistence that it will not put a dime into what Moscow says would be a $50 billion affair.

Railways Ministry officials say the ultimate plan is to lay rails from Japan to England. Valery Yudin, a spokesman for the ministry, said "several business plans" regarding the venture would be presented next month to the ministry's top officials.

Railway Minister Nikolai Aksyonenko went a step further, telling Interfax this week that by the end of next year, his ministry "really will start construction of the tunnel under the Tatarsky Straits, which will connect the mainland with Sakhalin."

A tunnel under the straits, which are about 10 kilometers across at their most narrow point, was begun in the 1940s, and apparently workers made it almost to the half-way point. But the project was abandoned after Stalin's death and it was not clear this week if the digging done half a century ago could still be used.

After the tunnel is built, the plan is to hang what would be the world's largest bridge, stretching 40 kilometers across the Pacific, from Sakhalin to the Japanese island of Hokkaido. At the moment, the world's largest bridge is the Seti-Ohashi, a 14.5-kilometer span between the Japanese islands of Honshu and Shikoku.

Railways Ministry officials say the massive infrastructure investments would pay for themselves in 15 or 20 years. Thanks to the certain increase in cargo transit between Europe and Japan alone, Railways Ministry officials told Itar-Tass, the Russian budget could earn an additional 20 billion rubles (about $750 million) annually.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Nov. 28


Join table-top game aficionados at the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test one’s intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



Times Talk