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Rasputin’s Notoriety Dismays Relative

Published: September 6, 2005 (Issue # 1102)


“He is either demonized or deified and my mission is to try and make his image look more human, more normal, if you like,” says Laurence Huot-Solovieff, 62, one of the four great-grandchildren of Grigory Rasputin to come from his legal marriage, and the only of his surviving descendants to have traveled to Russia.

Interviewed in St. Petersburg’s Astoria hotel on Monday, Huot-Solovieff, who grew up in France, put the wild-eyed mystic who some felt ruled the country during World War I in a positive light.

Rasputin had gained the confidence of Tsarina Alexandra because he could soothe the ailing Tsarevich Alexis. This ability gained him access to and influence with the family of the last tsar, Nicholas II.

It also generated hatred among courtiers, who plotted his demise and eventually murdered him.

On this, her fifth trip to Russia since she first visited in 1992, Rasputin’s great granddaughter traveled for the first time to her notorious ancestor’s home village of Pokrovskoye in Siberia.

“It is only now that I have been there that things finally came together with what my grandmother was telling me about him: I have heard the locals call him a simple man with big heart and strong spiritual power, who loved Russia, the God and the tsar,” Huot-Solovieff said. “This was exactly what I was told at home by my grandmother Matryona.”

Matryona, a dancer with the Barnum circus, was the only descendant of the doomed man to use his family name. It helped boost her artistic career in Los Angeles.

“I don’t think it would be a right thing for us to use his name now and in our circumstance: I find it too provocative,” Huot-Solovieff said. “There is too much hatred of his name and too many people would see red if they heard it.”

Rasputin’s name is surrounded by numerous myths, legends and speculations. International experts still debate his healing powers and political weight, producing controversial reports.

Huot-Solovieff has never questioned that Rasputin had the power of healing. “If he was no help to tsarevich Alexei to cure his hemophilia, he would have never been able to be so welcomed by the tsar,” she said. “This is pure logic but there is also enough evidence.”

Huot-Solovieff feels very close to St. Petersburg, but said some places are too painful for her to visit.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Nov. 24


Dr. Axel Schulte, Department Head at Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics in Dortmund, Germany, is the featured speaker at the SPIBA Industrial Committee lecture on “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Digitalization of the Supply Chain.” The event begins at 4 p.m. at the Graduate School of Management at 3 Volkohvsky Pereulok and registration is required by Nov. 21 either by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.



Tuesday, Nov. 25


Tag along with AmCham during their “Industrial St. Petersburg” Tour program today. This incarnation of the ongoing series will visit Philip Morris Izhora and include an Environmental Health and Safety Committee meeting.


Find out how to expand your business east during the “Business With China” forum beginning today and concluding tomorrow at the Lenexpo convention center. The largest Russian forum dedicated to business with the Asian giant, topics that will be discussed include logistics, customs clearance, trade financing and many more.



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