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Kesayev Report Points a Finger in Beslan

Published: December 9, 2005 (Issue # 1129)


Last week, the results of a North Ossetian parliamentary investigation into the terrorist attack in Beslan were made public. The report went largely unnoticed. The pro-government media shied away from a number of awkward conclusions, while the opposition was dissatisfied with the level of invective directed at the government of President Vladimir Putin.

There is no question that the parliamentary commission, headed by Stanislav Kesayev, deputy speaker of the North Ossetian legislature, came under enormous pressure. A good deal was also clearly cut out of the report in order to preserve the main point to determine who and what caused the first explosion in the school gymnasium, after which government troops stormed the school.

Three scenarios were in circulation before the report came out. The first, advanced by the prosecutors, held that the terrorists set off the bomb. The second version was offered by Nurpashi Kulayev, the lone suspected terrorist in federal custody: The explosion occurred after a sniper took out the terrorist who had his foot on the detonator. This is also what terrorist ringleader Ruslan Khuchbarov told authorities by telephone immediately after the explosion. According to the third version, the terrorists designated one man to blow everything up if things went wrong. This version says that on Sept. 3, 2004, at 1:03 p.m., thats exactly what he did.

None of these versions was ever substantiated. Khuchbarovs statement doesnt count for much. Thats exactly what you would expect him to say in the heat of the moment even if he had detonated the bomb himself. As for the sniper, there was no place for him to hide. In order to get a clean shot he would have been exposed in an open area with no cover apart from a small outbuilding.

More importantly, none of these versions explains why only a single bomb went off. If the bombs were wired together, they should all have gone off at once. The Kesayev report concluded that there were three explosions, not one: two small explosions at 1:03 p.m. and 1:05 p.m., followed by a large blast the actual bomb at 1:29 p.m.

So what exploded at 1:03 p.m. and 1:05 p.m.? Something blew a hole in the ceiling, through which the hostages saw the sky. A column of dust and smoke can be seen on video footage rising to a height of some 15 meters above the roof, indicating an explosion on the roof itself, not inside the gym. The sound of a grenade launcher firing can be heard on audiotape. A second shot quickly followed, blowing a hole in the north wall of the gym. Hostages then began to jump through the windows and the shooting started. Only 26 minutes after the rooftop explosion did the terrorists bomb go off.

The report also questioned the role of two deputies to Federal Security Service director Nikolai Patrushev in the counterterrorist operation. The commission had been able to establish what all of the command centers in Beslan had been up to during the siege, with one exception: the team led by Vladimir Pronichev and Vladimir Anisimov.

The upshot is that one of the command centers in Beslan set out to eliminate the terrorists, not to free the hostages. For this group, it would have been very convenient if the hostages were removed from the equation. Troops could then move in and wipe out the bad guys, and civilian deaths could be blamed on a miscue by the terrorists.

The simplest way to accomplish this would be to set off the terrorists own bomb. But here they ran into a little problem: The snipers couldnt get a clear shot at the terrorist with his foot on the detonator.

This problem was resolved with the help of a grenade launcher. Did the feds have the plans for the school? Yes. Did the plans indicate where the basketball hoop was attached to the wall? Yes. Did they know the bomb was hung up in the hoop? Yes.

The snipers needed a clear shot. A soldier with a grenade launcher could fire from the roof of any nearby apartment building.

Yulia Latynina hosts a political talk show on Ekho Moskvy radio.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Oct. 1


The St. Petersburg International Innovation Forum 2014 kicks off today at Lenexpo, where it will be presenting the latest and greatest ideas until Oct. 3. Focusing on economic development and the decisions and measures necessary to encourage development in Russias most important industries, the event is a possibility to discuss the innovations currently available in a variety of fields.


Representatives of the Russian and international media industries arrive in St. Petersburg for the first ever International Media Forum being hosted by the city until Oct. 10. With a variety of events on tap, including workshops, lectures and film screenings, the event plans to reemphasize the citys reputation as the countrys culture capital and as an emerging market and location for the visual arts.



Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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