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Ice Swimmers Brace Themselves for The Thaw

Published: April 4, 2006 (Issue # 1158)


The thaw began this week in St. Petersburg and the city seems ready to melt and disappear.

But for walruses, the name given to those people who like nothing better than to swim in holes cut into the frozen River Neva, rain and rising temperatures signal that the ice-swimming season is winding down.

April traditionally marks the end of ice-swimming fun. The frozen river flows again and soon after, beaches become crowded with fair-weather bathers.

Some walruses turn to cold showers, ice filled baths or punishing fitness regimes for consolation, but there is still time to catch them swimming or even to test the water oneself before the end of the season.

During the Epiphany celebrations in January, when temperatures plummeted to less than minus 30 degrees Celsius, nationalist politician Vladimir Zhirinovsky declared on television that This is why Americans cant understand what a Russian is! before plunging into a pool cut into the ice at Lake Bezdonnoye near Moscow.

Indeed, the idea of swimming outside in such extreme conditions is alien to foreigners of many nationalities. There is, however, method in the madness.

On a corner of the Peter and Paul Fortress, a sketch of a walrus marks the spot where enthusiasts meet to swim all year round in the River Neva.

Andrei Korotkov is one such swimmer. He is quick to reject the term walruses morzhi in Russian which is often used to describe winter swimmers, as it encourages an image of exclusivity.

This is not a club. We are all individuals and everyone is welcome here, Korotkov said as bystanders nodded in approval.

It is of no importance whether you are a Christian, a Jew or a Muslim it is just a question of the strength of your soul, Korotkov said as he gestured to the Sobornaya-Kafedralnaya Mechet, St. Petersburgs biggest mosque, nearby. Anyone can swim in the Neva as long as they are strong spirited.

The pastime is a great leveler and contrary to Zhirinovskys remark, Korotkov said it is certainly not exclusive to Russians.

Scots, Finns, Germans and Englishmen all swim here, he said.

When someone is half-naked at the edge of icy cold water their profession, religion and nationality seemingly become irrelevant.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 24


SPIBAs ongoing Breakfast with the Director series continues today, featuring Tomas Hajek, Managing Director of the Northwest Division at Danone Russia. Hajek will be discussing collaborations between businesses from different cultures. The meeting is at 9 a.m. at the Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel and all who wish to attend must confirm their participation by Oct. 23.


Get your gong on at Sounds of the Universe, a concert at the city planetarium this evening incorporating six different gongs to create relaxing songs that will transport you upwards into the stratosphere. Tickets are 700 rubles ($17).



Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop culture, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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