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European Court Hears Chechens' Lawsuits

Published: October 15, 2004 (Issue # 1012)


BRUSSELS, Belgium - Europe's top human rights court on Thursday heard the first cases involving alleged abuses by Russian military forces of six civilians who lived in Chechnya.

Lawyers for the six civilians - five of whom were in the packed courtroom - told a seven-judge panel at the European Court of Human Rights that Russian authorities had violated their clients' rights under the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights. Russia, as member of the 45-nation Council of Europe, is bound to uphold that convention.

Russia's representative at the court, Pavel Laptev, expressed hope that the case would not be "politicized."

"We view this case as a kind of test for the European Court: Will it comply with all principles of the European Convention and, most important, will it avoid double standards in its verdict?" he said, Interfax reported.

Bill Bowring, a human rights lawyer and professor at London Metropolitan University who is representing the Russian civilians, could not immediately be reached for comment.

The six are seeking 10,000 to 30,000 euros ($12,300 to $37,000) in moral damages and separate compensation for lost property and income at the court which is based in Strasbourg, France.

They hope to draw international attention to widespread human rights abuses of civilians during the military campaigns in Chechnya, lawyers said.

"This will be quite important recognition by a very authoritative international body that at least some operations in the course of the military conflict have been conducted in violation of current international law," Kirill Koroteyev, a lawyer for the victims, said ahead of Thursday's hearing.

Lawyers for the first two plaintiffs, Magomed Khashiyev and Roza Akayeva, argued their relatives were tortured and killed in 2000 during so-called sweep operations when federal forces searched households for suspected rebels.

They claim their right under the convention's articles right to life, prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment, and a right to an effective legal remedy were violated.

A second case involves Medka Isayeva, Zina Yusupova and Libkan Bazayeva, who claim their relatives were killed and their property destroyed in October 1999 by military planes.

The incident took place on Oct. 29 when thousands of civilians streamed from Chechnya to neighboring Ingushetia, having been promised a safe corridor out by authorities.

However, after they found the border was closed and were turned back, they were shelled by military planes, which left dozens killed and wounded. Russian officials later claimed they were targeting a rebel truck, the victims' lawyers said.

The court will also consider the case of Zara Isayeva, who says her son and three nieces were killed when the Russian military bombed the village of Katyr-Yurt in February 2000 in an attempt to destroy rebels.

Her lawyers argued her right to life and right to protection of property were violated, as well as her right to effective legal action.

Thursday's hearing lasted about 2 1/2 hours. A ruling is not expected for several months, court officials said.

o

New Chechen President Alu Alkhanov reappointed Sergei Abramov as the region's prime minister, Interfax reported Thursday.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 29


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Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



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