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Arctic Muslims

Published: May 11, 2007 (Issue # 1270)



  • The Nurd Kamal mosque, residential buildings and smelters in the arctic city of Norilsk last month.
    Photo: Denis Sinyakov / Reuters

  • The Nurd Kamal mosque in Norilsk.
    Photo: Denis Sinyakov / Reuters

NORILSK, Russia Mukum Sidikovs grandfather left Norilsk after surviving the labor camps of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.

Sidikov, caretaker of the worlds most northerly mosque, retraced his grandfathers footsteps in search of well-paid work in the Russian Arctic.

Now he estimates the city is home to about 50,000 Muslims just under one-quarter of the regions population of about 210,000. Most are from Azerbaijan and the Russian republic of Dagestan and work as traders or construction workers.

But as pay levels no longer compare so favorably with other Russian cities and Norilsk restricts access for foreigners, Sidikov says fellow Muslims no longer come here.

The population is getting smaller. People are leaving, said Sidikov, 40, an ethnic Uzbek born and raised in Kyrgyzstan.

The Nurd Kamal mosque stands exposed on the edge of modern Norilsk, where temperatures drop 50 degrees Celsius below zero (minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit). Polar winds whip its golden roof and snowdrifts pile against the turquoise walls in winter.

People work for pennies. They come here and lose their health. Every second person is ill, said Sidikov.

A city built on one of the worlds richest metals deposits, Norilsks first smelter was built by Gulag prisoners in the 1930s and today three plants send smoke thick with sulphur into the air.

The city was last year named among the worlds 10 most polluted places by independent environmental action group The Blacksmith Institute. Its main employer, Norilsk Nickel, is investing heavily in cutting emissions.

There are over 20 million Muslims in Russia, approximately 14 percent of the countrys 140 million population. The Central Asians and Dagestanis are likely to be Sunni, while those from Azerbaijan are most likely to be Shia. There is no antagonism between the sects in Norilsk and many Soviet Muslims are not among the strictest practitioners of Islam.

There are many Muslims, but few come to the mosque. They work all day and in the evening they are tired, Sidikov said.

The mosque, opened in 1998, was built by Mukhtad Bekmeyev, an ethnic Tatar and Norilsk native now residing in the Black Sea city of Sochi, nearly 4,000 kilometers away. He named the mosque after his parents and will pay for its restoration this year.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russias most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkins, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontovs short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library Systems website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Clubs weekly meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



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