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Design: the Swedish way

Published: June 1, 2007 (Issue # 1276)




  • Photo: For The St. Petersburg Times


  • Photo: For The St. Petersburg Times

In Sweden, the words invention and design go hand in hand. Both notions are meant to improve peoples everyday life by uniting technology, progressive thinking and beauty. Swedish Inventions, Swedish Design, an exhibition held in an outlet of Ikea, the iconic Swedish furniture and housewares retailer, in Dybenko this Sunday, aims to prove it.

The display, featuring about 40 objects from clothes for nursing mothers, robotic vacuum cleaners, rubber horseshoes and electricity generated from the oceans waves shows how innovation meets functional design in action.

Heres a quick insight into the Swedish way of thinking.

Celsius scale

The scale by which the entire world (apart from the U.S. and Jamaica) measures temperature was devised by Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius in the mid-18th century. Originally however, his scale indicated boiling point as zero degrees and 100 C was referred to as the melting point of ice. It was reversed after Celsius death by the Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778). He used his linnaeus-thermometer in the greenhouses where he grew the plants he studied. The word centigrade to describe the units of a thermometer was dropped in 1948 because it can be ambiguous in some languages: the correct term honors the inventive Swede who came up with the whole idea Celsius.

Product: Capillary thermometer for outdoor use

Inventor: Anders Celsius (17011744)

Company: Termometerfabriken Viking AB

Child safety seat

The first rear-facing child safety seat was designed by Bertil Aldman of Chalmers University in Gothenburg in the 1960s. Aldman was inspired by the position of the astronauts in the Gemini space capsule.

In the 1970s Volvo car makers picked up the pioneering idea and reported that this safety equipment led to a dramatic decline in child injuries in car accidents.

Product: Rear-facing car safety seat

Inventor: Bertil Aldman

Design: Karin ReikerIs

Manufacturer: Volvo Cars

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of Repulsion at 7 p.m. and Rosemarys Baby at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy The Tenant, the cult comedy The Fearless Vampire Killers and Cul-de-sac among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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