Friday, August 1, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Russians the Quickest to Marry and Divorce

Published: December 14, 2004 (Issue # 1029)


MOSCOW - Russians are the quickest to marry, but also to divorce, out of all the citizens of countries in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, a UNICEF report has found. Also, Russia retains its long-time leadership in abortions and the share of children in residential care, the survey of 27 countries said.

Demographics experts explain the high marriage rate of young Russians by the persisting negative attitude of their parents to sexual relations outside marriage, while the high abortion rate is due to poor knowledge of family planning and the high price of birth-control pills.

The report, issued last month, summarizes demographic and socioeconomic trends based on official statistics since 1989.

It says that an average of seven couples get married in Russia each year per 1,000 people - more than double the rate in Georgia, which has just three weddings per 1,000 people.

But Russians are also the most likely to get divorced, with a record six couples per 1,000 people getting divorced in 2002, or 83 percent of the marriage rate.

Next in the divorce stakes are Estonians (almost 70 percent), while the lowest divorce rate among the countries surveyed is in Tajikistan (7 percent).

"In Russia, free love among the young is not welcomed by their parents, who in most cases continue to provide for their children for quite a long time," said Olga Kurbatova, a researcher at the Institute of General Genetics. "Not every mother will agree with her daughter's boyfriend moving in, especially if their home is the modest apartment in which most Russians live."

The early marriages, which are just attempts to legitimize sexual relations between emotionally immature and socially and economically dependent young people, are prone to quick breakups, Kurbatova said, adding that children born in these unstable unions often become an undesirable burden for parents.

The study also finds that the share of children deprived of parental care in Russia is the largest among the surveyed countries: More than 420,000, or one in 70, children under 17 live in infant homes, orphanages and boarding schools.

In neighboring Ukraine, the rate is three times lower than in Russia, while in Turkmenistan - where the country's authoritarian president, Saparmurat Niyazov, himself grew up in an orphanage - government statistics say only one child in 2,400 lives in residential care.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldn’t miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



Times Talk