Saturday, November 29, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

The Challenge of Finding a Remedy for Health Care

Published: August 26, 2008 (Issue # 1402)



  • Eight-month-old Alexei Artemikhin recovering from heart failure in a hospital in the Kirov region.?
    Photo: Country of Dmitry Sedykin

MOSCOW — When anesthesiologist Dmitry Sedykh was called to treat an 8-month-old suffering from heart failure this May, he found no equipment to resuscitate the baby boy.

Sedykh, the only anesthesiologist in the village of Lesnoye in the Kirov region, was summoned to the children’s ward of the local hospital to help little Alexei Artemikhin, who was in critical condition because of severe pneumonia.

The boy needed oxygen, but the hospital had no oxygen concentrator, a device used to provide oxygen therapy to patients. Like many small, rural hospitals, this one also lacked a centralized system in which oxygen is shipped through pipes. The hospital did have compressed oxygen in tanks, but because of the decrepit condition of the children’s ward, fire inspectors had banned them from being used there.

All Sedykh could find was an antiquated oxygen pillow, a rubberized sac filled with oxygen from a tank. The oxygen passes from the pillow through a plastic pipe to a humidifier, where a nasal catheter then feeds it to the lungs.

“But there was not even a catheter to carry oxygen from the pillow to the baby’s lungs. Do you think I am a magician?” Sedykh said by telephone from Lesnoye.

Sedykh took an adult oxygen mask and somehow adapted it to the baby’s face. To humidify the oxygen, he filled a 20-gram syringe with wet cotton, placed it between the plastic pipe and the mask. After pumping the pillow with his hands for a few minutes, he saw the boy’s checks take on a rosy glow. Sedykh called for a nurse.

“I told her, ‘Keep pumping this pillow. Maybe we’ll be able to take the boy to the district hospital tomorrow,’” he said.

The boy needed a new pillow every 20 minutes. Nurses scurried in and out of the room as they filled pillows with oxygen from the tanks in the adult ward. The process continued day and night for a week before Alexei was finally transported to the larger district hospital in the town of Kirs.

Inventive medical treatments are just the tip of the iceberg of the health care crisis facing Russia. The country ranks a lowly 130th in terms of the effectiveness of its health care system and 127th in terms of its population’s health, according to the World Health Organization. This means that the country is not only considerably behind developed Western countries but also the majority of East European and Latin American countries with a similar level of economic development.

At the same time, Russians tend to fall ill much more often than Europeans. In fact, Russians are 30 percent more likely to get sick than Europeans, according to WHO figures.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3 ] [4 ] [5 ] [6]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



Times Talk