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The Forsythe saga

Published: July 29, 2005 (Issue # 1091)



  • Andrian Fadeyev dancing Forsythe.
    Photo: For The St. Petersburg Times

LONDON Still known overseas as the Kirov Ballet, the Mariinsky Ballet will close its two-week season at the Royal Opera House in London on Saturday with a performance of La Bayadere led by its top stars Ulyana Loptakina and Igor Zelensky. On Monday the Mariinsky Opera, which tours London less frequently than the Mariinsky Ballet, will open its one-week season with Boris Godunov.

Loptakinas superlative performance of Swan Lake opened the Covent Garden season on a high note, while the first week of the Marriinsky Ballets London engagement ended with two performances last Sunday of a program of short works by William Forsythe. Now an almost monthly fixture in the troupes St. Petersburg repertoire, the Mariinskys program of one-act ballets by the 56-year-old American choreographer was presented to London audiences for the first time.

The Forsythe program included the Mariinskys newly acquired ballet Approximate Sonata (1996) which was premiered in this years Mariinsky Ballet Festival in St. Petersburg in March. It is a fascinating work consisting of five duets with some dialogue thrown in. Andrei Ivanov, usually cast as a jester figure, was brilliant as the lead dancer who appeared in the beginning and end of the ballet.

Yevgenia Obraztsova, his partner in the first and fifth duet, was totally ravishing in her classical purity. In the second duet, the young corps de ballet dancer Yelena Vostrotina was most eye-catching; her stunning long limbs lent an amplitude to the choreography. The colorful casual costumes designed by Stephen Galloway enhanced the ballet.

Another 1996 Forsythe work The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude, which received the loudest applause last Sunday night, is Forsythes homage to George Balanchine, the greatest choreographer of the 20th century; its sunny and joyous choroegraphy evoke Balanchines masterpiece Symphony in C.

Tatiana Tkachenko was particularly impressive among the three women, and danced with amazing control. Andrian Fadeyev and Leonid Sarafanov, two of the Mariinskys most exciting male virtuosos, were dazzling in the demanding, speedy choreography.

In the afternoon, Fadeyevs role was competently danced by the the 20-year-old coryphee dancer Vladimir Shklyarov, who is surely another male star in the making. What a pity that Shklyarov was not featured more prominently in London.

The program opened with the 1985 work Steptext, set for a ballerina and three men, apparently intended by Forsythe to re-examine the tradition of the duet and the role of the ballerina. It is the least satisfying work in the program. The gimmickry house lights being turned on and off unexpectedly, and the abrupt stopping of the taped music of Bachs Chaconne was rather offputting. However, Diana Vishnyova and Daria Pavlenko were equally splendid in the two casts. Igor Kolb was trim and incisive in his rapid solo.

The closing work, In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, is Forsythes most famous ballet and is danced by a number of companies worldwide including Londons own Royal Ballet.

This ballet has a split focus instead of a central focus, with more than one dance happening simultaneously. For instance, a duet can take place at the same time as a solo on another part of the stage. Dancers often face the back of the stage instead of the front. There is a constant tension and disequlibrium in this ballet, enhanced by Thom Willems music.

Forsythes choreography fits the Mariinsky Ballets supreme classical style perfectly. This Forsythe program marks another triumph for the Mariinsky Ballet on the London stage.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Jan. 25


Get out your running shoes for the 46th International Road of Life Marathon. Dedicated to the end of the blockade, three runs are offered 5, 21 and 42 kilometer runs starting in different places outside the city. Busses leave from 13/1 Arsenalnaya Naberezhny at 8 a.m. but check complete details and registration fees on www.newrunners.ru/race/doroga-zhizni-2015



If you are planning a wedding, head over to the Azimut Hotel, 43/1 Lermontovsky Prospekt from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The day includes live music, free dance classes and vendors selling wedding dresses, accessories, cakes and services to help make your special day perfect. Admission is free.



Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.







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