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When two worlds collide

A new exhibition at Erarta combines two ideologically opposed concepts.

Published: January 30, 2013 (Issue # 1744)



  • Barykins pieces represent a fusion of Soviet and U.S. poster art styles.
    Photo: FOR SPT

Soviet Pin-Up, which sees the merging of Soviet social posters with American pin-up art, is a genre that couldnt have existed just a few decades ago. But now the style, represented by posters by Valery Barykin, an artist from Nizhny Novgorod, is being showcased and even sold at Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art.

In the Soviet Union, social posters portraying happy, rosy-cheeked citizens were used to deliver an all-encompassing range of messages, from warnings on the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption to encouraging workers to look after their tools and young people to exercise regularly, and of course, to promote Communist tenets.

The American pin-up style, which appeared in the 1930s and 40s, was more about sex than socialism, and consisted of printed images of glamour and fashion models or actresses that could be pinned to the wall. This aesthetic reached its peak in the 50s, when magazines were packed with scantily clad beauties.

The most interesting thing about the exposition is collaboration and mixture. It is global art on the one hand, but a focus on Soviet history on the other hand, said Polina Zakharova, director of Erarta Galleries.

Barykins exhibition consists of 17 limited edition posters that can be bought in two sizes: 130 centimeters x 90 centimeters, and 90x60, priced at 25,000 rubles ($830) and 10,000 rubles ($332) each, respectively.

It is our first limited edition project, said Zakharova. This format is now very popular abroad, especially in the U.K. and U.S.

Sales of original posters represent a chance for collectors to buy works signed by the artist.

Poster art is popular because it still gives a sense of exclusivity; you buy an original work, but it is more affordable than a masterpiece, said Zakharova.

While many of the young people visiting the show at Erarta will be familiar with the works of Barykin from the Internet, for their parents, the exhibition represents a chance to see how the Soviet poster has survived and evolved in contemporary art, and to recall its role in the U.S.S.R.

Nowadays, a lot of modern art first appears on the Internet, but still has to be exhibited to prove its significance.

It is a logical release of Internet art, said Zakharova. There are more and more projects every year that begin on the Internet and end up in real exhibition spaces all over the world.

Erarta Galleries is the department of the museum of the same name that promotes modern Russian art for sale. With branches in London, New York, Zurich and one soon to be opened in Hong Kong, Erarta promotes modern Russian art far beyond the boundaries of the former Soviet Union. Forthcoming projects, according to Zakharova, will be realized in collaboration with Dmitry Shorin (whose sculpture for the project I Believe in Angels can now be seen in the galleries) and Maksim Kaetkin, an artist from Perm.

Soviet Pin-Up runs through March 11 at Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art, 2, 29th Liniya,

Vasilyevsky Island. Tel. 324 0809.

www.erarta.com. Entrance is free of charge.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, July 31


Develop your leadership abilities during a lecture by famous Russian author and coach Radislav Gandapas. The event starts at 9 a.m. at 5 Lodeinopolskaya Ulitsa. The price for entry is 20,500 rubles ($570).


Relax and enjoy a Parisian atmosphere with some romantic and laidback jazz tunes during the Night of French Music at Lenny Jam Cafe, 63 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 250 rubles ($7).


The Womens Business Club is hosting a Beauty Brunch where participants are invited to discuss the latest news in the beauty industry and listen to lectures by professional stylists in the business.



Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldnt miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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