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MGU Regains Top 50 Spot

Published: March 6, 2013 (Issue # 1749)



  • Despite its prestigious reputation, Moscow State University does not rank so highly on more objectively assessed lists.
    Photo: Vladimir Filonov /spt

MOSCOW Moscow State University, or MGU, has regained a spot among the worlds 50 most reputable institutions of higher learning, according to Times Higher Education magazines annual college ratings, released Monday.

But Moscow States objective score, which takes into account learning environment, research influence and innovation, remains outside the top 200.

The encouraging thing about the reputation ranking is that its based on subjective perceptions, which means its highly regarded, the lists editor, Phil Baty, said by phone from London. Moscow State is gaining from a very famous history, which makes it prestigious and well-known around the world.

But theres a big depth between the World Reputation Rankings, based on opinions, and the World University Rankings, based on objective factors, Baty added.

Moscow State came in at No. 50 on this years reputation list, based on the opinions of 16,639 published academics from around the world. The school came in 33rd in 2011, the first year the reputation ranking was published separately.

However, it didnt make last years list, an absence Baty called a very strange situation, noting that different academics were polled each year.

It is great to see Russia break into the global top 100 indeed, into the top 50, Times Higher Education said in an e-mail to The St. Petersburg Times. This means that Lomonosov Moscow State University is seen globally as a serious force in teaching, research and innovation, and this gives it a strong platform for consolidation.

However, it should be noted that this strong showing in terms of subjective reputation is in stark contrast with the institutions relatively modest standing in the largely objective World University Rankings, where Moscow State sits outside the top 200. The university must use its strong global reputation to improve, as it cannot rely on reputation alone.

The reputation survey has given the top six places to the same schools for the past three years: Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, the University of California at Berkeley and Stanford University. Those six have only been swapping places with one another.

St. Petersburg State University and Novosibirsk State University are the only other Russian schools to have appeared in the top 200 rankings. Baty attributed Russias relatively poor showing to brain drain, insufficient funding and a lack of research publications in English.

Although perception can help Moscow State move forward and attract additional funding and talent, Russia has to invest more in a skilled workforce, innovations and technology to improve its position in the rankings, Baty said.

President Vladimir Putin last year ordered the government to ensure that at least five Russian universities got into the worlds top rankings by 2020. Baty said that goal would be very challenging but not impossible.

The fact that Moscow State is increasing communication with the international scholarly community and that its researchers have started publishing more work in English is also helping the universitys standing, Baty said.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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