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Former Chernobyl Pilot Soars Above His Obstacles

Published: May 31, 2005 (Issue # 1074)



  • Vladimir Melnik followed in the footsteps of his father, a test pilot for the early MIGs.
    Photo: VLADIMIR FILONOV / SPT / For The St. Petersburg Times

MOSCOW - If there are men who have gone through fire and water, Nikolai Melnik is certainly one of them.

Once a test pilot, Melnik lives in Spain, where he has received a royal award for his efforts in aerial firefighting. His most dangerous mission, however, came in 1986, when he was sent to help measure radiation at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant after one of its reactors exploded.

Making about 40 sorties to the area, he was hit by radiation 10 times above the permitted level. Predictably, medical complications ensued.

"In 1994, I had two operations. ... Doctors told me to stay away from drinking and smoking, and lead a normal life," Melnik said as he lit a cigarette. "A month later, I decided I would live the way I like, not limiting myself in anything."

For the past decade, Melnik, 51, has been living comfortably with his wife and son in a house in Alicante, Spain, fighting fires and helping out in emergency situations.

Living what he calls a calm and stable life in Spain, Melnik said he would trade it back for the years when he did "real man's work."

"If I was given what I had back in the Soviet times, I would not have gone to Spain," he said. "What I do in Spain now is a game for kids. I used to do serious risk-related work."

Back in 1986, working as a test pilot with the Kamov helicopter design bureau, Melnik was summoned to Moscow to prepare for the Chernobyl mission.

However, it was only on the way to Borispol Airport in Kiev that he was told what he would be doing.

Melnik's task was to place radiation sensors in the reactor by dropping them with a 200-meter cable from his helicopter.

"I just thought, 'Woe is my youth!' when we were told what we were about to do," Melnik said. "I was 32 years old."

A few days before flying to Kiev, he was practicing the maneuver he would have to perform at Chernobyl at the Kamov facility in southeast Moscow: dropping a heavy weight into a small circle.

"It looked like a preparation for some official show," he said.

Melnik's interest in aviation followed his father, who was among the first pilots to test-fly the MiG-9, the first jet fighter made by the famous design bureau after World War II.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Sept. 15


Angelic music will ring out in the city during this week’s Third International Harp Competition. Hosted by the Shostakovich Philharmonic in collaboration with the Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation, the country’s best musicians with 40 to 47 strings will convene to find out who’s best.



Tuesday, Sept. 16


Lenexpo plays host to Tekhnodrev, a three-day convention that focuses on the woodworking industry in Russia. Promoting the latest technologies and trends, the event features not only exhibitors from some of Russia’s largest woodworking companies but representatives of the forestry industry, who will have their own coinciding forum.


Parlez-vous français? We don’t here at The St. Petersburg Times but that doesn’t mean you can’t. Join the British Book Center’s French Club meeting this evening at 6 p.m. in their location near Technologichesky Institut metro station.



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