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Corruption Flourishes in Russias Border Zones

Published: May 15, 2013 (Issue # 1759)



  • Blagoveshchensks exception to usual border zone limitations allows visitors freedom of movement.
    Photo: WIKICOMMONS

MOSCOW Onthe face ofit, there are few similarities between thecity ofBlagoveshchensk, located inthe Far East, andthe countrys natural gas capital ofNovy Urengoi, 3,000 kilometers away inthe tundra just below theArctic Circle.

But both cities are part ofofficial border zone territory: areas ofland abutting Russias borders that are closed tovisitors andunder thedirect control ofthe Federal Security Service, or FSB.

Frequent changes tothe exact boundaries ofborder zones andarbitrary enforcement ofaccess suggest that they are asource oflarge scale corruption anddesigned tocontrol population movements rather than being anecessity fornational security, according toexperts.

Thedifference between therestrictions inBlagoveshchensk andNovy Urengoi reveal some ofthis ambiguity.

Visitors toBlagoveshchensk, which sits onthe other side ofthe Amur River fromthe Chinese city ofHeihe, enjoy complete freedom ofmovement because it is inexplicably exempted fromthe usual border zone limitations.

Novy Urengoi, incontrast, saw roadblocks go up onits outskirts last year as officials activated its border zone status that had lain dormant forfive years. Novy Urengoi is thousands ofkilometers fromthe nearest foreign country.

It is thelite version ofthe Soviet Union, said Natalya Zubarevich, director ofthe regional program atthe Independent Institute ofSocial Policy.

Inplace since the1930s, border zones, or pogranichnie zoni, were abolished in1993 after thefall ofCommunism but re-instated in2006 under President Vladimir Putin. Toenter thezone, all non-residents, foreigners andRussians alike, must obtain aspecial permit fromthe FSB aprocedure usually requiring about amonth tocomplete. Thelimitations onentering border zones are one example ofa panoply ofSoviet-era restrictions being enforced with increasing zeal inmodern Russia. Legislation tobroaden thesignificance ofthe residence permit, or propiska, is currently moving through theState Duma andis expected tocome intoforce later this year.

Inrecent years, there has been asteady growth inthe intensity with which restrictions onmovement inborder zones have been applied bythe security services.

In2007 just 13,364 people were caught illegally entering border zones. But this rose to33,797 people in2012, according tostatistics provided toThe St. Petersburg Times bythe FSB.They need toshow that they are catching more andmore people, said Andrei Soldatov, asecurity expert andfounder ofthe Agentura.ru think tank. Especially inthe regions, themindset ofthe FSB is thesame as it was inthe Soviet Union.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Oct. 1


The St. Petersburg International Innovation Forum 2014 kicks off today at Lenexpo, where it will be presenting the latest and greatest ideas until Oct. 3. Focusing on economic development and the decisions and measures necessary to encourage development in Russias most important industries, the event is a possibility to discuss the innovations currently available in a variety of fields.


Representatives of the Russian and international media industries arrive in St. Petersburg for the first ever International Media Forum being hosted by the city until Oct. 10. With a variety of events on tap, including workshops, lectures and film screenings, the event plans to reemphasize the citys reputation as the countrys culture capital and as an emerging market and location for the visual arts.



Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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