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Residents and Migrants Clash Violently in Suburb

Published: May 29, 2013 (Issue # 1761)


St. Petersburg investigators opened an investigation following a fight between migrant workers and local residents last Friday in the suburban village of Pargolovo.

The case will investigate the accusations surrounding reports of the violent assault, the website of the St. Petersburg Investigation Committee said.

The conflict began when three local men, under the influence of alcohol, attacked a citizen of Tajik descent. The victim ran to his dormitory to escape and the three attackers fled the scene.

Later that night the same three men returned, entering the victims dormitory with two guns and physically assaulting the migrants living there. One victim was later hospitalized, the Investigation Committee stated.

After leaving the dormitory, the suspects went to a nearby soccer field and fired five times at a group of migrants returning from work to their dormitory.

One worker suffered minor injuries and was later hospitalized.

The three men are reported to be 32, 29 and 26 years old. Preliminary information claims the reason for the conflict stemmed from an earlier argument between the men and the migrant workers.

St. Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast police ordered an increase in police patrols in Pargolovo to prevent any further conflict, Interfax said.

This is not the first reported attack on migrant workers this month in St. Petersburg. On May 3, police detained a group of people suspected of attacking migrant workers from Uzbekistan after one of the victims was hospitalized with a head injury, Zaks.ru online portal said.

Police have also reported fights between the migrants themselves. In February, seven citizens of Uzbek descent fought in the city, the result of a dispute over a woman. Two participants in the fight were hospitalized with minor injuries, Baltinfo reported.

The number of migrant workers in Russia continues to grow every year, stoking resentment among a large part of Russias native population. However, experts say Russia needs migrant workers to keep its economy developing since migrants often do the physically toughest, lowest paid work. Migrants often agree to work in uncomfortable conditions and, even though they are paid little for their work, it is enough to support their families back home where incomes are extremely low.

Searching for ways to make the life of migrant workers in Russia safer and more comfortable, Russian authorities, including in St. Petersburg, have organized Russian language courses for workers, who often speak little to no Russian and are unaware of their rights.

The number of foreign nationals coming to Russia continues to rise, the Russian Federal Migration Service deputy head Anatoly Kuznetsov said in March, adding that compared with the same time last year, the number of migrants entering the country has grown 14 percent.

According to official FMS statistics, the number of migrant workers in Russia is close to five million people, including three million who are here illegally.

Meanwhile, experts say the real figures are much higher and may be closer to 10 million. According to the 2012 International Migration Outlook, issued last year by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Russia is home to the worlds largest illegal migrant population, accounting for almost seven percent of the countrys workforce, RIA Novosti reported.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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