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Film Festival Focuses on Hidden Truth

Published: September 18, 2013 (Issue # 1778)



  • The film festival will showcase over 100 films, including “The Act of Killing,” which focuses on the 1960s genocide of Indonesia’s ethnic Chinese minority.
    Photo: For SPT

The Soviets never cared much for documentaries. Anything that challenged the carefully constructed, ideological foundations of the socialist state was seen as dangerous. Few such films, even during the thaw of the 1980s when documentaries began playing a larger role in the Russian film industry, made it past censors and into theaters. In a carefully managed reality, it’s easier to keep things to a simple matter of black and white. This is never true though; life, after all, is Technicolor.

Every year, the Message to Man Film Festival, Russia’s only documentary film festival, demonstrates that the human experience is far more complicated than what it may seem from a perfunctory glance. 2013 marks the 23rd edition of the festival since it began in 1989, in what was still Leningrad, and when parts of the films were muted because of perceived subversive content.

Beginning on Sept. 21 and running until Sept. 28, Message to Man will screen 233 films from 37 different countries in theaters throughout the city. As is the tradition, ticket prices for all showings range from a mere 50 rubles ($1.54) to an affordable 100 rubles ($3.08).

The program includes an international competition featuring 54 films divided into three categories: Feature-length documentaries, short documentaries as well as animated films. A domestic competition will present films either made in the Russian Federation or bearing a “National Film” certificate and will feature English subtitles for non-Russian speaking viewers.

Other portions of the lineup include the In Silico International Competition of Experimental Films as well as the Docville Theater Program, a series of theatrical performances incorporating film or video that challenge existing conventions of what defines a genre.

More than 100 films will be given their Russian premiere at the festival, including four world premieres, along with 19 special screenings, musical performances, exhibitions, meetings and various workshops featuring directors and producers.

This year also marks the first time that selected films from the program will be screened simultaneously at a sister festival in Moscow. While the main festival will last a week in the northern capital, Moscow will only have three days, Sept. 23-25, to share the experience.

Alongside the iconic festivals held in Cannes, Berlin, and Venice, Message to Man ranks as a Class A festival for documentary films. Under the direction of Alexei Uchitel, the Russian filmmaker who has acted as president of the festival since 2010, the event continues to expand from year to year and has become an anticipated event on the St. Petersburg cultural calendar.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Jan. 25


Get out your running shoes for the 46th International Road of Life Marathon. Dedicated to the end of the blockade, three runs are offered — 5, 21 and 42 kilometer runs — starting in different places outside the city. Busses leave from 13/1 Arsenalnaya Naberezhny at 8 a.m. but check complete details and registration fees on www.newrunners.ru/race/doroga-zhizni-2015



If you are planning a wedding, head over to the Azimut Hotel, 43/1 Lermontovsky Prospekt from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The day includes live music, free dance classes and vendors selling wedding dresses, accessories, cakes and services to help make your special day perfect. Admission is free.



Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.







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