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Rosneft Announces Share Price for Minority Buyout

Published: October 2, 2013 (Issue # 1780)



  • Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev addresses the International Investment Forum in Sochi.
    Photo: Alexander Astafyev / Pool / AP

On Monday, Sept. 30, Rosneft agreed to buy out the minority shareholders in RN-Holding (formerly TNK-BP) that remained from the Russian state energy companys acquisition of TNK-BP in March this year. According to a Rosneft press release, the shares are valued at about $2 apiece.

Rosneft CEO Igor Sechin had previously been opposed to the idea. According to Bloomberg, Sechins company has over $71 billion in debt, largely as a result of this years TNK-BP acquisition. Recent deals that have seen Rosneft acquire expensive natural gas assets have left Sechin even less inclined to fork over the extra money to these minority shareholders, who represent 5 percent of the former TNK-BP. At $2 a share, full acquisition of these shares would cost Rosneft about $1.5 billion.

Though Rosneft formally set the share price on Sept. 30, the decision to buy was made three days earlier in the form of a verbal commitment between Sechin and Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev at the International Investment Forum in Sochi.

To an audience of Russias business elite, Medvedev spoke generally about the countrys foreign investment climate and what the state has been doing and what it will be doing to improve it. He stressed the importance of the state taking responsibility for corporate governance and explicitly highlighted three state companies: Gazprom, Russian Railways and Rosneft.

At this point in his speech, Medvedev turned and addressed the Rosneft CEO, who was sitting only two seats away. I know that Rosneft, for example, still has an issue related to its minority shareholders, TNK-BP. Is this right, Mr. Sechin? Sechin affirmed that it was.

Medvedev proposed that to set an example of proper behavior, Sechins company should buy these shareholders out.

Sechin addressed Medvedev but looked primarily at the audience and consented, albeit hesitantly.

Taking into account your concern and solutiondespite the absence of a legal obligation to repurchase part of these shares, we will fulfill your objectives, but on a voluntary basis.

The issue that Medvedev was referring to dates back to Sechins initial refusal to buy out these minority shareholders or grant them 2012 dividends following the March acquisition that made Rosneft the largest oil company by market capitalization in the world. Rosneft is not a charity, Sechin had said earlier this year, in an attempt to explain this refusal.

One disgruntled shareholder, Gennady Osorgin, claimed that Sechins statements and actions had ruined the stocks value and in June filed a complaint against him with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs, or the RSPP, reported Vedomosti. Official review of the complaint is ongoing.

While Sechins change of heart in Sochi was likely a welcome surprise to minority shareholders, the proposed price of $2, announced by Rosneft on Monday, was a disappointment. The main shareholders of former TNK-BP, by contrast, received almost double that amount per share in the $55 billion acquisition six months ago. Half of TNK-BP had consisted of four tycoons Mikhail Fridmen, German Khan, Viktor Vekselberg, Len Blavatnik who ended up splitting $28 billion.

Rosneft is the worlds largest oil company by output and is expected to have earnings of $13.8 billion in 2013. This will make it the largest contributor to the Russian state budget.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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