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Hendrik Kerstens New Old Masters

Published: December 18, 2013 (Issue # 1791)



  • Hendriks Kerstens 'Lampshade,' left, from 2008 and Bag from 2007.
    Photo: Hendrick Kerstens / for SPT

  • Doily from 2011 turns a humble piece of paper into a 17th-century collar.
    Photo: Hendrick Kerstens / for SPT

With the end of 2013 in sight, and with it the Netherlands-Russia year in which the two countries have been party to a series of economic, cultural and social events celebrating their long bilateral relations, one event has caused a significant amount of international interest and attention.

Hendrik Kerstens exhibition of large-scale color photographs, titled Paula, had already been seen in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, New York, Los Angeles and Latin America before it arrived in St. Petersburg but that did nothing to dim the enthusiasm with which it has been met.

With work in the collections of the Art Museum of Santa Barbara and Gemeentemuseum in The Hague, to name but a few, Kerstens reputation preceded him. His latest work, which is now on view in the Erarta Museum in St. Petersburg, follows on the heels of well-received exhibitions at the Ekaterina Cultural Foundation in Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod and Yekaterinburg.

Born in the Hague in 1956, Kerstens work is celebrated for its alchemical admixture of the arts of photography and painting. For nearly two decades, he has documented his daughter Paulas life thorough photographic portraits.

Beginning his project with portrait photography, since 2008 he has placed her in more constructed settings that reference Dutch painting from the seventeenth-century. Bringing to mind the paintings of Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals, Kerstens emulates the traditional style of the most famous artworks of the period as an ode to the Golden Age of Dutch painting, elevating the humble family portrait to luminous new heights.

The relationship between Dutch painting and photography has long been pondered, with Johannes Vermeer being said to have employed a camera obscura. The clarity of the portraits by the Dutch painters of the Golden Age and their sensitive use of light make them the perfect reference for contemporary photography.

Rather than slavish imitation, Kerstens recreation of Dutch painting also includes references to contemporary life. The photographers slyly humorous, almost tongue-in-cheek approach to his sources and the sheer breadth of the project address issues of seriality, time and identity, while emotionally they speak to his love for his child and their ongoing collaboration.

The thing that fascinates me in particular is the way a seventeenth-century painting is seen as a surface which can be read as a description of everyday life as opposed to the paintings of the Italian Renaissance, which usually tell a story. Northern European painting relies much more on craftsmanship and the perfect rendition of the subject. The use of light is instrumental in this, Kerstens has said of the project.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburgs showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the teams website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literatures most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poets birthday. The tragic tenors work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russias greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Centers Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test ones intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only mans best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during todays reenactment titled Winter War: How it Was. More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie Black Cat, White Cat, as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of Takoy Festival, a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonights festival finale is Fathers and Sons, a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenevs classic about familial relations.



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