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Hendrik Kerstens New Old Masters

Published: December 18, 2013 (Issue # 1791)



  • Hendriks Kerstens 'Lampshade,' left, from 2008 and Bag from 2007.
    Photo: Hendrick Kerstens / for SPT

  • Doily from 2011 turns a humble piece of paper into a 17th-century collar.
    Photo: Hendrick Kerstens / for SPT

With the end of 2013 in sight, and with it the Netherlands-Russia year in which the two countries have been party to a series of economic, cultural and social events celebrating their long bilateral relations, one event has caused a significant amount of international interest and attention.

Hendrik Kerstens exhibition of large-scale color photographs, titled Paula, had already been seen in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, New York, Los Angeles and Latin America before it arrived in St. Petersburg but that did nothing to dim the enthusiasm with which it has been met.

With work in the collections of the Art Museum of Santa Barbara and Gemeentemuseum in The Hague, to name but a few, Kerstens reputation preceded him. His latest work, which is now on view in the Erarta Museum in St. Petersburg, follows on the heels of well-received exhibitions at the Ekaterina Cultural Foundation in Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod and Yekaterinburg.

Born in the Hague in 1956, Kerstens work is celebrated for its alchemical admixture of the arts of photography and painting. For nearly two decades, he has documented his daughter Paulas life thorough photographic portraits.

Beginning his project with portrait photography, since 2008 he has placed her in more constructed settings that reference Dutch painting from the seventeenth-century. Bringing to mind the paintings of Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals, Kerstens emulates the traditional style of the most famous artworks of the period as an ode to the Golden Age of Dutch painting, elevating the humble family portrait to luminous new heights.

The relationship between Dutch painting and photography has long been pondered, with Johannes Vermeer being said to have employed a camera obscura. The clarity of the portraits by the Dutch painters of the Golden Age and their sensitive use of light make them the perfect reference for contemporary photography.

Rather than slavish imitation, Kerstens recreation of Dutch painting also includes references to contemporary life. The photographers slyly humorous, almost tongue-in-cheek approach to his sources and the sheer breadth of the project address issues of seriality, time and identity, while emotionally they speak to his love for his child and their ongoing collaboration.

The thing that fascinates me in particular is the way a seventeenth-century painting is seen as a surface which can be read as a description of everyday life as opposed to the paintings of the Italian Renaissance, which usually tell a story. Northern European painting relies much more on craftsmanship and the perfect rendition of the subject. The use of light is instrumental in this, Kerstens has said of the project.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Aug. 21


Time is running out to see the fantastic creations on display at the 2014 Sand Castle Festival on the beach at the Peter and Paul Fortress. Adhering to the theme of Treasure Island, visitors can wander amongst larger-than-life interpretations of pirate life or attend one of the workshops held to educate a future generation of sand artists. The castles will remain on the beach until Aug. 31.



Friday, Aug. 22


Get ready to pledge allegiance to the flag during National Flag Day, paying tribute to when, 23 years ago today, the iconic hammer-and-sickle was replaced with the tricolor that now flutters in the wind. Petersburgers will be treated to a free concert on Palace Square, a military parade and a culminating air show featuring Russias Russian Knights stunt pilots.



Saturday, Aug. 23


Uppsala Park plays host to Fairy Noon today, a performance of five separate fairy tales ranging from folk classics to more haunting selections. There will be three different renditions of the tales throughout the day and tickets start at 500 rubles ($13.80) for adults and 300 rubles ($8.30) for children.


Classic Finnish cartoon characters the Moomins expect to receive a warm welcome from Russian fans during todays Moomin Festival at the Pearl Plaza Shopping Center at 51 Petergofskoye Shosse. Become a kid again or introduce a new generation to the beloved creation of Finnish writer Tove Jansson.



Sunday, Aug. 24


The tortured genius of Dutch master Vincent van Gogh gets his day in the centers Konnushnaya Ploschad during Make Art Like Van Gogh, a daylong celebration of the artist that will allow amateur artists to try and replicate the work that made the famed painter world-renowned.


Experience a variety of dances highlighting the diversity of the world around as at the final day of the Ethno-Dance International Dance Festival that has been at the St. Petersburg Humanitarian University of Trade Unions this past week. Tonights performance will feature Egyptian dancers accompanied by local orchestras.



Monday, Aug. 25


Today kicks off the Elena Obraztsovoy International Competition for Young Vocalists in the large hall of the Shostakovich Philharmonic. Talented youngsters will showcase their range over the next six days before a winner is chosen on Aug. 30.



Tuesday, Aug. 26


Love movies but hate all those words? Then check out Rodina Cinema Centers Factor of Consensus film forum this evening. Silent movie classics from the beginning of the 20th century will be screened and accompanied by a pianist, who will provide the soundtrack for the ongoing action. The screenings begin at 7 p.m. Check Rodinas website for more details.



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