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Kazakhstan Field's Riches Come With a Price

Published: October 23, 2001 (Issue # 715)



  • Winterton plans to turn the 7.5-meter-thick, football-field-sized slabs of sulphur into pellets for export to Mediterranean markets.
    Photo: Christopher Pala / For The St. Petersburg Times

The Tengiz field in Kazakhstan is considered one of the greatest petrochemical finds ever. But it is also one of the most challenging. As Christopher Pala reports, there's a lot more to extracting oil there than boring a hole in the ground - like dealing with 200-meter towers of fire and millions of tons of eye-burning sulfur.

TENGIZ, Kazakhstan - Viewed from an approaching helicopter, the enormous slabs of canary-yellow sulfur reflect the desert sun like flattened gold bars, dwarfing the shiny processing plants of the world's sixth-largest oil field set on the parched shores of the Caspian Sea.

There are 4.5 million tons of sulfur at Tengiz spread out on football-field-sized cakes that are 7.5 meters thick. And every day another 4,500 tons of liquid sulfur comes up with the oil and is sprayed with agricultural watering equipment out onto the yellow slabs, solidifying rapidly into a luminous, porous material that gives off hardly any odor at all. It has accumulated here in such huge quantities because of the simple fact that the cost of getting it to market is more than what people will pay for it: Sulfur is a commodity, used as fertilizer and in the chemical industry, that today is in abundant supply.

The giant slabs represent a testimony to the impressive amounts of oil that Tengiz has already produced, but they are also a huge challenge staring the Chevron executives who operate the Tengiz field in the face: How can one find a way to dispose of so much sulfur?

The oil field's other eye-catching features are the five flaring towers that, day in and day out, send plumes of smoky orange flames into the air. With all gas pipelines leading to Russia - a country awash in gas - building the facilities to break it down and sell to Russia is not an effort that makes any economical sense.

"It is impossible to find any serious excuse for flaring," wrote Kazakh oil expert Sagat Tugelbayev in a local oil journal recently, "because it is a waste of one of the most valuable raw material required for industrial and domestic needs."

Tugelbayev's statement is representative of the widely held view among the 15 million residents of this former Soviet central Asian republic, a country the size of Western Europe. As a result, the government of President Nursultan Nazarbayev has been saying publicly for years that Tengiz's gas must be utilized, not flared.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, July 23


SPIBA’s Legislation & Lobbying Committee invites everyone interested in the practical aspects of courts and procedural law to today’s Legal Debating Club at 9:30 a.m. at the Mertens House, 21 Nevsky Prospekt, office 506. Visit spiba.ru for more details.


Take advantage of the sunny summer days and participate in Beach Games 2014, which runs through July 27 in Sestroretsk’s Dubki Park.



Thursday, July 24


Liliana Modiliani, a well-known Russian stylist, will talk about choosing clothes that fit during her lecture at 7 p.m. at the Pryamoy Efir art club, 13 Viborgskoe Shosse.



Friday, July 25


Discuss Russia’s economic and political prospects for 2014 during a Business Breakfast organized by SPIBA at 9.30 a.m. in the Bank Saint-Petersburg office at 64


Malookhtinsky Prospekt.


Start your weekend with adorable miniature pigs at the Squealing Pig festival at 7 p.m. this evening in the Karl & Friedrich restaurant, 15 Iozhnaya doroga, on Krestovsky Island.



Saturday, July 26


Hundreds of brand-new and retro cars, drag and drift shows, test drives and karting are planned for the Avtobum-2014 festival, which will take place in front of the RIO shopping center at 2 Fuchika Ulitsa.


Participants in today’s SaniDay Summer competition will impress visitors with their hand-made, unusual and hilarious boats, which will race at the Igora Resort near the 54th kilometer on Priozerskoe Shosse.


Metro Family Day will include both serious lectures for adults and master-classes for children, making the event interesting for the whole family. To participate, come to Kirov Park on Yelagin Island.


Photography will be the focus of today’s Photosubbota, which features lectures by famous photographers, meetings with photo schools and studio representatives, and participation in a photography competition. The event starts at noon at Petrokongress, 5 Lodeynopolskaya Ulitsa.


If you like cycling, make sure to visit the Za Velogorod Festival with its retro bike exhibition, market and live music. The second round of the Leningrad Criterium race will also take place during the event at Petrovsky Arsenal in Sestroretsk.



Sunday, July 27


Navy Day will be celebrated with a weapon and military transportation exhibition, self-defense master classes and concerts. The event starts at 1 p.m. in the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburg.



Monday, July 28


Don’t miss a chance to see the latest achievements in robotics during the RoboDom interactive show, exhibiting more than 150 robots. The show will be at BUM center, 22/2 Gzhatskaya Ulitsa, until Aug. 3. The entrance ticket costs 350 rubles ($10).



Tuesday, July 29


A video of a Queen concert from 1986 will be shown today at 8 p.m. in Yaschik, 50/13 Ligovsky Prospekt.



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