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Chris Floyd's Global Eye

Published: December 25, 2001 (Issue # 733)


What kind of sick and twisted men could sit around calmly, in safety and comfort, while planning the murders of thousands of innocent people, all to further their own extremist faith, which holds that no other system but their own should be allowed to exist on earth? Men with no conscience and no soul, coldly calculating the number of deaths it would take to goad their enemy into action and set the world aflame in a holy war between the righteous and the infidels - where could you possibly find such degraded minds?

Why, on the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, of course!

Yes, America's shiniest military brass have at times been given to Osamic convulsions of terrorist fervor, drawing up plans to sink American ships, shoot down American planes and launch terror campaigns in American cities, "even in Washington" - all to create "pretexts to provide justification for U.S. military intervention in Cuba."

This was the gist of "Operation Northwoods," devised by America's top military leaders and presented to President John Kennedy in 1962, ABCNews.com reports. The existence of Communist Cuba 150 kilometers off the coast of God's country was an intolerable affront to the honchos of the military-industrial-mafiosi complex (MIM), which had formerly gorged itself on the rich corruption of the right-wing Batista regime.

Their outrage was compounded by one of the CIA's rare fiascos in nation-gutting: the failed Bay of Pigs invasion a few months before, a "humiliation" that left the hard Right - and its many sympathizers in the military - howling for Kennedy's head on a platter. Hoping JFK would now seek to restore the lost national manhood, the brass drew up a full-scale plan for the invasion and military occupation of Cuba.

That's where the "pretexts" came in. The boys in braid evinced a devilish imagination worthy of al-Qaeda as they plotted terrorist campaigns complete with assassinations and bombs in American cities, blowing up American ships in Cuban harbors - "casualty lists in U.S. newspapers would cause a helpful wave of national indignation," they wrote - even contemplating the explosion of America's first manned space flight - all to be blamed on Castro, of course.

A few days after the head of the Joint Chiefs, General Lyman Lemnitzer, presented the plan to the White House, Kennedy told him he would never authorize a U.S. military invasion of Cuba. A few months later, in the midst of a Senate investigation into right-wing extremism in the military, Kennedy removed Lemnitzer from the military's top spot.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous’ in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of ‘Repulsion’ at 7 p.m. and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy ‘The Tenant,’ the cult comedy ‘The Fearless Vampire Killers’ and ‘Cul-de-sac’ among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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