Thursday, November 27, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Chris Floyd's Global Eye

Published: December 25, 2001 (Issue # 733)


What kind of sick and twisted men could sit around calmly, in safety and comfort, while planning the murders of thousands of innocent people, all to further their own extremist faith, which holds that no other system but their own should be allowed to exist on earth? Men with no conscience and no soul, coldly calculating the number of deaths it would take to goad their enemy into action and set the world aflame in a holy war between the righteous and the infidels - where could you possibly find such degraded minds?

Why, on the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, of course!

Yes, America's shiniest military brass have at times been given to Osamic convulsions of terrorist fervor, drawing up plans to sink American ships, shoot down American planes and launch terror campaigns in American cities, "even in Washington" - all to create "pretexts to provide justification for U.S. military intervention in Cuba."

This was the gist of "Operation Northwoods," devised by America's top military leaders and presented to President John Kennedy in 1962, ABCNews.com reports. The existence of Communist Cuba 150 kilometers off the coast of God's country was an intolerable affront to the honchos of the military-industrial-mafiosi complex (MIM), which had formerly gorged itself on the rich corruption of the right-wing Batista regime.

Their outrage was compounded by one of the CIA's rare fiascos in nation-gutting: the failed Bay of Pigs invasion a few months before, a "humiliation" that left the hard Right - and its many sympathizers in the military - howling for Kennedy's head on a platter. Hoping JFK would now seek to restore the lost national manhood, the brass drew up a full-scale plan for the invasion and military occupation of Cuba.

That's where the "pretexts" came in. The boys in braid evinced a devilish imagination worthy of al-Qaeda as they plotted terrorist campaigns complete with assassinations and bombs in American cities, blowing up American ships in Cuban harbors - "casualty lists in U.S. newspapers would cause a helpful wave of national indignation," they wrote - even contemplating the explosion of America's first manned space flight - all to be blamed on Castro, of course.

A few days after the head of the Joint Chiefs, General Lyman Lemnitzer, presented the plan to the White House, Kennedy told him he would never authorize a U.S. military invasion of Cuba. A few months later, in the midst of a Senate investigation into right-wing extremism in the military, Kennedy removed Lemnitzer from the military's top spot.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg’s showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the team’s website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literature’s most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poet’s birthday. The tragic tenor’s work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russia’s greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test one’s intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



Times Talk