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Passions Run High As Olympics Close

Published: February 26, 2002 (Issue # 748)


Editor,

I attended the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and saw first hand some of the issues raised by the Russian Olympic Committee.

I congratulate [Alexei] Yagudin and [Yevgeny] Plushchenko on their splendid performances in the men's figure-skating competition. They are very deserving of the medals they received and are to be commended.

I watched with great anticipation the ice-dancing original program, and without a doubt the Russian pair - who ultimately took silver - should have been placed first. The French pair was also talented, but in my opinion the Russian pair was superior. I did not have an opportunity to watch the free dance, and therefore cannot render my opinion.

Now on to the bigger problems. The Russian pairs figure-skating team did not deserve the gold medal. I have seen them skate before, and had they skated up to their potential on that particular day, they would have won the gold medal. But they did not. They lacked luster, their timing was off, their jumps were not perfect. The Canadians were, in my eyes, the winners.

In the women's program, Irina Slutskaya had a mediocre performance. I have seen her skate before, and she is amazing, but she was not amazing for the long program. It was almost as if she were taking for granted that she would be the winner. Sarah Hughes was not only flawless, but technically and artistically superior to Slutskaya.

Whether it is a U.S. team, Russian team, French team or otherwise, I like to see the best win.

I remember watching the Protopopovs, who are legendary, as is Oksana Baul and Viktor Petrenko. All were deserving of their medals. I wept when Baul beat Nancy Kerrigan for the gold, but she won outright. She was the best on that day.

I think the performance should be looked at and not the nationality of the skaters.

Rose Mary Rogers

Miami, Florida

From an Expert

Editor,

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous’ in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of ‘Repulsion’ at 7 p.m. and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy ‘The Tenant,’ the cult comedy ‘The Fearless Vampire Killers’ and ‘Cul-de-sac’ among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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