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Outrage At Amber Room Book

Published: June 15, 2004 (Issue # 977)



  • A wall of the recreated Amber Room in the Catherine Palace. It reopened last year during the city's 300th anniversary.
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / The St. Petersburg Times

Russian cultural figures have reacted with outrage to a new book on the fate of the Amber Room, which the book says was destroyed in Koenigsberg during World War II.

It is not clear that any of the critics have read the book and none of them have presented any evidence that the book is wrong.

The book, "The Amber Room: The Untold Story of the Greatest Hoax of the Twentieth Century", was published this month.

Russians have heavily criticized the book, with former Culture Minister Mikhail Shvydkoi accusing the authors of trying to rewrite history.

Even the thought that the Red Army could, willingly or not, be behind the destruction, is perceived as blasphemy in Russia.

British journalists Catherine Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy spent several years researching Russian archives, most of them in St. Petersburg. Their conclusions are largely based on the diaries of Anatoly Kuchumov, former curator of the Amber Room, who was involved in the search of the room after the war, and the evidence of several witnesses.

But Russian scholars argue that Kuchumov's diaries contain no speculations of the kind made in the book.

"Kuchumov's diaries have been well examined, and there is nothing in them alluding to the idea that the Amber Room could be destroyed by the Soviets," said Adelaida Yolkina, senior researcher at the Pavlovsk Museum Estate. "He also never made oral or written statement suggesting that the Red Army was to blame."

Yolkina said she found the accusations insulting.

"Back then it was a principle of the state to find and preserve cultural valuables that perished during the war," she said.

"Every little thing was looked after and returned, even a small fragment of a toe of a sculpture wouldn't be thrown away. It is impossible to see the Red Army being so careless that they let the Amber Room be destroyed."

But the authors insist they weren't trying to make a political point with the book.

"It was about reporting the evidence only," Scott-Clark said Monday in a telephone interview from Albany in the United States. "Furthermore, when we started working on this issue we were hoping to be able to find the Amber Room. But eventually, through the evidence that we received it became obvious that the Amber Room was gone in the fire."

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Dec. 22


Pick out the latest fashions as holiday gifts for loved ones or as early presents for yourself during the Christmas Design Sale at Kraft on Obvodny Kanal, starting on Dec. 20 and continuing through Dec. 27. Designer clothes will be on sale every day of the week or you can buy something more festive to decorate the home while sipping on hot coffee and perusing the various master classes.



Tuesday, Dec. 23


Meet Arctic explorers Fedor Konukhov and Viktor Simonov during SPIBA’s and Capital Legal Service’s event “Arctic Expedition” this morning in the Mertens House business center at 21 Nevsky Prospekt. The meeting will discuss the explorers’ ongoing eco-social project and how companies can use the project as a unique marketing opportunity. Email office@spiba.ru by Dec. 22 if you wish to attend.



Wednesday, Dec. 24


The Anglican Church of St. Petersburg we will be holding a Christmas Eve service at 7 p.m. led by Rev Wm. Shepley Curtis of the Episcopal Church. The service will be held at the Swedish Church at 1/3 Malaya Konyushennaya Ulitsa.



To have your event included in All About Town, email tot@sptimes.ru



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