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Kursk Enquiry Ends, No Charges Made

Published: July 30, 2002 (Issue # 790)


MOSCOW - Prosecutor General Vladimir Ustinov closed a criminal investigation into the Kursk nuclear-submarine sinking Friday, saying nobody would be charged because the disaster was caused by a technical malfunction - leaky torpedo propellant.

Ustinov also defended the Kremlin's handling of the botched rescue efforts, saying that all 118 sailors aboard died within eight hours after the Kursk sank in the Barents Sea on Aug. 12, 2000, long before any help could arrive.

"The disaster occurred at 11:28 and 26.5 seconds, Moscow time, because of the explosion of a practice torpedo inside the fourth torpedo tube," Ustinov said at a news conference. Within two minutes and 18 seconds after the first blast, other combat weapons detonated in a powerful explosions that threw the submarine to the seabed and killed most of its crew.

When the navy located the submarine on the seabed some 30 hours after the catastrophe, "there was already no chance to save anyone," he said, speaking after reporting his verdict to President Vladimir Putin.

He insisted that no one was to blame for the torpedo's malfunction. A government commission had previously pointed at a leaky torpedo as the only possible cause.

"The investigators have decided to close the criminal case since no evidence of a crime has been found," Ustinov said. "Those who designed the torpedo couldn't foresee the possibility of its explosion."

He dismissed allegations that the navy could have triggered the disaster by damaging the torpedo while loading it onto the Kursk. "There is no evidence and no testimony that the torpedo was dropped," Ustinov said.

He said the torpedo exploded suddenly as the Kursk was moving under periscope close to the surface, preparing for a practice torpedo attack. He said the recovered shiplog and crew conversation recorders contained no sign of anything awry.

Stanislav Proshkin, the head of the Gidropribor research institute that designed the torpedo, challenged the verdict in remarks carried by the Interfax-Military News Agency. He said the weapon could only have exploded after an internal impact, most likely a fire in the bow.

Ustinov said the Northern Fleet chief and several other top naval officials fired last fall were ousted for flaws in organizing the exercise the Kursk had been taking part in that "weren't directly linked" to the disaster.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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