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Irish humor

A new project brings comics across borders.

Published: April 18, 2012 (Issue # 1704)



  • Irish comic Dylan Moran.
    Photo: IGOR MEERSON AND ANTON BORISOV

Dylan Moran, best known for his role as the Irish alcoholic Bernard Black in the U.K. series Black Books, became the first native English-speaking comedian to perform stand-up in Russia last week.

The 1980s and 90s saw the birth of the rocker in Russia and a subsequent frenzy for foreign music: Now, in 2012, the way is being paved for the same flurry of excitement this time for international stand-up comedy.

Morans performances on Thursday and Saturday evenings at Chaplin Hall were part of a joint experiment organized by Igor Meerson and Anton Borisov of the hit Russian TV show Comedy Club together with Mick Perrins U.K. agency Just for Laughs Live.

The general format of stand-up comedy in Russia is a 10-minute stint, with little or no prior experience, learning on the spot and frantically responding to the audiences jeering or applause. Stand-up has existed amongst the student community for a while now and is present at Open Mic nights held at Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art, but the program is still in its experimental phase. Accordingly, the organizers of Dylan Morans shows felt that there was much to be gained from a dialogue between Russian comics and their Western counterparts.

Its not just the Russians who benefit. The opportunity to perform in another country is also a cultivating experience for Western comedians, according to Nick Handford, a representative from Just for Laughs Live.

Russian stand-up is such a learning experience that it is immediately interesting for anybody coming here, and not only that: Hopefully this will open the door to bringing Russian comedians over to the U.K., to broaden our horizons even further, said Handford.

On the challenges of performing a routine that would be entertaining to a Russian audience, Moran said before his show Saturday: I may have built up in my head the differences between East and West and thought, I must find out what works here just because I dont know it; I dont know what people talk about and how they conduct themselves I didnt want to go on and be talking to myself; I wanted to be talking to people about the reality of their lives.

Everything was covered in Thursdays show, from the citys controversial new law banning homosexual propaganda to imprisoned oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Despite the rapturous applause that Moran received throughout the show, and even with the translation being delivered through earphones to the non-English-speaking portion of the audience, at times, the language barrier proved insurmountable. Having got tied up in explaining a hat box as a box of hats, he exclaimed, exasperated, I dont know why Im repeating myself thinking it will be any clearer!

Linguistic difficulties are one thing, and only to be expected, but cultural differences are not as easily reconciled. Moran commented during his show that it was especially difficult to know when the audience found something funny because unlike in the West where people generally just laugh out loud, people in Russia tend to clap as a sign of approval. Russian people obviously laugh through their hands. I wonder, do you also cry through your knees? he joked.

In the end, the cultural differences proved too much for the courageous comedian and he ended, visibly disappointed, telling his audience that they seemed to have become disconnected.

For all of us, [the project] is a big thing because apparently nobodys done it before, Moran said later. So, you know, we just wanted to see whether it would work. You cant have everything you want and it might not be the best gig, but thats not the point. The point is just: Can we make this work somehow? Were at that stage, you know, very early days in the lab.

The lab work is continuing, with more Western comedians soon to be confirmed as coming to grace the stages of St. Petersburg. It looks like international stand-up comedy is well and truly on its way to Russia.





 

ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 3


Although the Peter and Paul Fortress sand sculptures are more central and therefore more visible to the throngs of tourists, the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburgs own collection closes today. The World Collection of Sand Sculptures that have been on display at the park reaches its final day, so fans of the classic beach activity should get there while they can.



Thursday, Sept. 4


Vladimir I. Danchenkov, Head of Baltic Customs, will be in attendance during AmChams Customs and Transportation Committee Meeting convening this afternoon at the organizations office near St. Isaacs Square at 3 p.m.



Friday, Sept. 5


Scrabble lovers and chess masters get their chance to assert their intellectual dominance at the return of the British Book Centers Board Game Evenings tonight. Held weekly on Friday nights, the event gives both board game lovers and those hoping to improve their English the chance to meet, greet and compete. Check out the centers VK page for more details.



Saturday, Sept. 6


Athletes will relish the chance to get the latest gear and try out something new at I Choose Sport, an annual event at Lenexpo forum that plans to welcome more than 30,000 people this week to the international exhibition center. Not only will visitors get to try their hand at various athletic endeavors but they will also be able to peruse equipment that can fulfill their dreams of becoming a champion.


Local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg open their season this evening at home against Lokomotiv Yarovslavl at the Ice Palace arena next to the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. See their website for a full schedule and available tickets.



Sunday, Sept. 7


Check out retro and antique cars at Fort Konstantin on Kronstadt Island in the Gulf of Finland at FORTuna, a yearly car festival that highlights the eccentricities of the Soviet automobile industry. A car race, contests and a stunt show will give visitors a chance to rev their engines.



Monday, Sept. 8


This evening marks the opening of the two-week ballet festival High Season at the Mikhailovsky Theater. Check the theaters website for more details about performances and featured dancers.



Tuesday, Sept. 9


Discuss the latest news and issues at the AmCham Hazardous Waste Management Roundtable this morning in the Tango Conference Hall of the Sokos Hotel Palace Bridge on Birzhevoy Pereulok. Starting at 9 a.m., planned topics include the Krasny Bor landfill and waste transportation between Russia and Finland.


Learn more about the citys modern architectural trends at the SPIBA Real Estate and Construction Committees meeting on the topic Contemporary Petersburg Style: What is It? Participants will get the chance to discuss whats in-demand with RBI Holdings Irina Petrova and Lubava Pryanikova, and the current state of the local real estate market. Please confirm your attendance by Sept. 5 through SPIBAs website if you wish to attend.



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