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British Council Shut Down, FSB Blamed

Published: January 18, 2008 (Issue # 1340)



  • A woman attempts to visit the British Council offices in St. Petersburg on Wednesday afternoon. The British Council fully shut down its operations on Thursday.
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / The St. Petersburg Times

  • Stephen Kinnock
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / The St. Petersburg Times

The British Council suspended its activities in St. Petersburg and Yekaterinburg on Wednesday, and expressed the hope that its Moscow office would be able to continue the work.

Stephen Kinnock, head of the British Council office in St. Petersburg, told The St. Petersburg Times on Thursday that there was very little chance the St. Petersburg office would reopen in the foreseeable future.

In a statement issued from London earlier Thursday, British Council Chief Executive Martin Davidson said that the Russian authorities have made it impossible for us to operate in St. Petersburg and Yekaterinburg so I have taken the decision to suspend operations in both cities.

Kinnock added, We had no choice because of all the pressure we had.

Davidson said the Council was concerned about the wellbeing of our staff.

I feel we cannot continue our work without significant risk to them, Davidson said, referring to a campaign of intimidation against the Councils staff he said had been initiated by the Russian government at the beginning of this week.

On Tuesday Jan. 15, the Russian State Security Services (FSB) summoned over 20 Russian staff to attend individual interviews. Late that night 10 members of staff were visited at home by the Russian tax police and called for further interviews [on Wednesday], Davidson said on Thursday.

He said the interviews had little to do with their work and were clearly aimed at exerting undue pressure on innocent individuals.

Davidson said it was wrong to draw cultural relations and the British Council into an international political dispute.

Im bitterly disappointed that the Russian authorities have sought to limit our cultural and educational links at the very time when they can be of most value, he said.

Davidson said that he reiterated that the British Council operates in Russia in full accordance with international and Russian law, adding that the British Council remains committed to Russia and hopes to continue to work with our one-and-a-quarter million Russian partners and customers from our Moscow office.

Meanwhile, Britains foreign minister David Miliband criticized the actions of Russia.

Such actions deserve reproach and are not worthy of a great country, Miliband said in a statement to the British parliament on Thursday, Interfax said.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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