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Finns Advised on Bribery in Russia

Published: January 25, 2005 (Issue # 1038)


HELSINKI - Finnish authorities criticized a leading trade body on Friday for publishing a book giving advice on bribery for Finns doing business in Russia.

The book, titled "Russian Customs for Finns," gives examples of what kind of bribes can be given and how, seeking to aid businesses from a country known for its transparency. "If you have to give a bribe, it has to be done discreetly, definitely without external witnesses, or rather by using a Russian frontman," the book, published by the Finnish-Russian Chamber of Commerce, quoted a Finnish businessman as saying.

The Chamber used a Finnish government grant to finance the publication the instruction book deeming it a necessary tabletop accessory for Finnish businessmen. Finland has been acknowledged as the world's least corrupt country in terms of business transactions by the Transparency Internatioanl organization.

Although the book was actually published two years ago, it provoked a scandal last Friday, when the authoritative Finnish daily Helsingin Sanoman cited a chapter from a book, in which Finnish businessmen discussed their experiences in bribing Russian officials.

"Of course you have to talk about the operating environment, but not like that," said Henrik Raiha, a senior official at the Trade and Industry Ministry, which provides some 20 percent of the organization's annual financing. "Now the reader gets the picture that you can't cope in Russia without bribing," he said.

A Chamber of Commerce spokesman defended the book, saying it "is a description about how real life is in Russia."

(Reuters, Mosnews, SPT)





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at today’s Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nation’s premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the city’s elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolan’s latest film “Mommy” at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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