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Blood on Sofa Proved to Be Pushkins

Published: February 9, 2010 (Issue # 1546)



  • Tatyana Mazura, deputy director of the Pushkin Apartment Museum, points at the sofa on which the bloodstains were found.
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / The St. Petersburg Times

St. Petersburgs forensic experts have confirmed that the bloodstains found on the sofa on which the famed 19th-century Russian poet and author Alexander Pushkin is said to have died in 1837 were indeed left by the poet.

The results of our medical research allow us to state that it is the poets blood on this historic sofa, Yury Molin, deputy head of the Leningrad Oblast legal and medical department, said at a press conference in the citys Pushkin Apartment Museum on Monday.

The painstaking year-long research proved firstly that the blood on the sofa was located on the exact spot where Pushkins wound would have been bleeding.

For that purpose the researchers put a paper model of Pushkins body on the sofa, and then put the waistcoat Pushkin was wearing during his fatal duel on the model. The bloodstains on the waistcoat matched the place where the bloodstains were found on the sofa, said Molin.

Secondly, experts ascertained that the blood on the sofa and the waistcoat came from a male belonging to blood group A (the second group, according to the Russian system,) and that both bloodstains had been there for many decades.

Molin said the scientists had also tried to conduct more detailed analysis of the bloodstains, including DNA and spectrum tests. However, the condition of the blood and need to treat the samples very carefully due to their historical value made the additional tests impossible.

For instance, we could cut out a piece of the sofa to conduct a thorough analysis in a special lab, but neither we nor the museum would treat a historical relic like that, Molin said.

Nor could we do much to the waistcoat, so we just put a compress on it to absorb some blood from it in order to at least establish the blood group, he said.

Molin said the results of the research could be seen as indirect due to the absence of DNA results, but that the overall results from the available methods proved that it was the blood of one of Russias best-loved historic figures.

The other aim of the analysis, according to Molin, was to establish whether or not the medical treatment given to Pushkin at his home was appropriate and whether he would have survived had he been taken to hospital, Interfax reported.

Molin said the results of the tests proved that taking Pushkin to hospital would not have saved his life, because the level of help that the hospital doctors could have offered the poet was no higher than that provided by the family doctors.

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