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Strict Drug Law Puts Vets in Jam

Published: April 18, 2012 (Issue # 1704)



  • Alexander Shpak faces 8 1/2 years in jail for selling ketamine to an agent.
    Photo: VKONTAKTE.RU

MOSCOW After eight years offighting astrict law that virtually bans ananesthetic essential fortheir work, Russias veterinarians say they have nearly reached theend oftheir tether.

Ketamine has long been used foroperating onanimals throughout theworld, but when it came invogue as aparty drug inthe late 1990s, Russias response was toban thesubstance entirely in2003. Outcry among vets ensued, andit was reinstated forveterinary use in2004, but under such strict conditions that it is almost impossible toobtain.

It was technically legalized but inreality rejected. Inthe last eight years, only 5 percent ofvets have obtained licenses tobe able touse it, says Irina Novozhilova, president ofVITA, ananimal rights group. I thought when it all started that it would be sorted out very fast because you cant just ban aprofession. Towork without anesthesia is tocut animals when they are conscious.

Oleg Aristov, who runs aveterinary clinic inSt. Petersburg, said thealternatives are heartbreaking.

It is really painful foryour pets toundergo operations [without ketamine], Aristov said. It hurts them.

This has left vets between arock anda hard place, with two contradictory laws condemning them whichever way they turn.

If avet uses ketamine, that is aviolation ofArticle 228 forthe distribution ofnarcotics, whereas if they operate onconscious animals, it is aviolation ofArticle 245 forcruelty toanimals. So avet is faced with thechoice ofwhich law tobreak, Novozhilova said.

Ina worse case scenario, under thecurrent laws, vets face apossible sentence ofup to20 years inprison just fordoing their work. But they are left with few options.

The best medicines are believed tobe opiates, but they are completely banned inRussia, so ketamine is our only choice, Novozhilova added. Measures other than ketamine absolutely do not give thedesired effect.

Despite thelaw, vets have continued touse ketamine without alicense forthe past eight years, but thesituation was thrown intoturmoil once again inMarch, when Alexander Shpak ofSt. Petersburg was sentenced to8 1/2 years ina penal colony.

He was caught selling ketamine byan undercover agent fromthe Federal Drug Control Service, who befriended him bypretending tobe avet. Theagent eventually persuaded Shpak tosell him thedrug, claiming it was needed foran urgent operation.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Oct. 1


The St. Petersburg International Innovation Forum 2014 kicks off today at Lenexpo, where it will be presenting the latest and greatest ideas until Oct. 3. Focusing on economic development and the decisions and measures necessary to encourage development in Russias most important industries, the event is a possibility to discuss the innovations currently available in a variety of fields.


Representatives of the Russian and international media industries arrive in St. Petersburg for the first ever International Media Forum being hosted by the city until Oct. 10. With a variety of events on tap, including workshops, lectures and film screenings, the event plans to reemphasize the citys reputation as the countrys culture capital and as an emerging market and location for the visual arts.



Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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