Wednesday, September 3, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

Duma Bill to Clamp Down on Non-Government Organizations

Published: December 26, 2012 (Issue # 1741)


MOSCOW Amid thepublic furor over theState Dumas proposed ban onU.S. adoptions, many seem tohave overlooked thefact that theso-called anti-Magnitsky act, which passed thelower house ofparliament onFriday, would also place harsh new restrictions onnon-governmental organizations.

Unlike theadoptions ban, thenew restrictions onU.S. funding forcertain groups havent sparked pickets outside theDuma, andtens ofthousands havent signed online petitions opposing them.

But human rights leaders say therules are afurther tightening ofthe screws oncivil society organizations, which have been pressed inrecent months bynew laws that expanded thedefinition oftreason andrequired certain groups toclassify themselves as foreign agents, which all major NGOs boycotted.

It feels like war has been declared, said Alexander Cherkasov, head ofthe Memorial human rights organization. Nobody sewed onthe yellow star. Thenew law, toextend themetaphor, says: Well shoot you even if youre not wearing ayellow star.

Theproposed rules would make it illegal forNGOs that receive funding fromU.S. citizens or organizations toparticipate inpolitical activities or otherwise threaten Russias national interests.

They would also ban Russian citizens who hold American passports frombeing members or leaders ofpolitical NGOs, including local branches ofinternational groups, which could see their assets seized forbreaking thelaw.

Civil society leaders worried that thebills vague language meant it could be used selectively.

Theres no established legal definition ofa threat against Russian interests, forinstance, therefore theanti-Magnitsky act is not alaw, concluded Transparency Internationals Yelena Panfilova.

Therestrictions onRussians who hold American passports seemed tobe aimed atveteran human rights leader Lyudmila Alexeyeva, Panfilova said, referring tothe head ofthe Moscow Helsinki Group, Russias oldest human rights watchdog.

Alexeyeva, 85, was forced toemigrate fromthe Soviet Union in1977 andreceived U.S. citizenship in1982. She returned toRussia in1993 andreceived aRussian passport as well.

Last week, Irina Yarovaya, head ofthe Dumas Security Committee, lashed out atAlexeyeva byquestioning her loyalty ina statement carried onthe partys website.

Pages: [1] [2]






 

ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 3


Although thesand sculptures at the Peter and Paul Fortress are more centrally located and therefore more visible to the throngs of tourists, the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburgs own collection closes today so fans of the classic beach activity should get there while they can.



Thursday, Sept. 4


Vladimir I. Danchenkov, Head of Baltic Customs, will be in attendance during AmChams Customs and Transportation Committee Meeting convening this afternoon at the organizations office near St. Isaacs Square at 3 p.m.



Friday, Sept. 5


Scrabble lovers and chess masters get their chance to assert their intellectual dominance at the return of the British Book Centers Board Game Evenings tonight. Held weekly on Friday nights, the event gives both board game lovers and those hoping to improve their English the chance to meet, greet and compete. Check out the centers VK page for more details.



Saturday, Sept. 6


Athletes will relish the chance to get the latest gear and try out something new at I Choose Sport, an annual event at Lenexpo forum that plans to welcome more than 30,000 people this week to the international exhibition center. Not only will visitors get to try their hand at various athletic endeavors but they will also be able to peruse equipment that can fulfill their dreams of becoming a champion.


Local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg open their season this evening at home against Lokomotiv Yarovslavl at the Ice Palace arena next to the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. See their website for a full schedule and available tickets.



Sunday, Sept. 7


Check out retro and antique cars at Fort Konstantin on Kronstadt Island in the Gulf of Finland at FORTuna, a yearly car festival that highlights the eccentricities of the Soviet automobile industry. A car race, contests and a stunt show will give visitors a chance to rev their engines.



Monday, Sept. 8


This evening marks the opening of the two-week ballet festival High Season at the Mikhailovsky Theater. Check the theaters website for more details about performances and featured dancers.



Tuesday, Sept. 9


Discuss the latest news and issues at the AmCham Hazardous Waste Management Roundtable this morning in the Tango Conference Hall of the Sokos Hotel Palace Bridge on Birzhevoy Pereulok. Starting at 9 a.m., planned topics include the Krasny Bor landfill and waste transportation between Russia and Finland.


Learn more about the citys modern architectural trends at the SPIBA Real Estate and Construction Committees meeting on the topic Contemporary Petersburg Style: What is It? Participants will get the chance to discuss whats in-demand with RBI Holdings Irina Petrova and Lubava Pryanikova, and the current state of the local real estate market. Please confirm your attendance by Sept. 5 through SPIBAs website if you wish to attend.



Times Talk