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Under Child Adoption Threat, Ireland Scraps Magnitsky List

Published: May 4, 2013 (Issue # 1757)


Ireland has dropped plans to impose U.S.-style Magnitsky sanctions on Russia after Moscow warned that it might respond by banning Irish parents from adopting Russian children.

The Russian opposition assailed Ireland for the reversal, saying it had not only bowed to Kremlin blackmail but had also shown a lack of leadership as the current president of the European Union.

Irish lawmakers had drafted legislation to blacklist Russian officials implicated of human rights violations in the Magnitsky case. But Russia's ambassador to Ireland, Maxim Peshkov, wrote to the Irish parliament's foreign affairs committee in March that any attempt to introduce a Magnitsky list might have a "negative influence" on an agreement on child adoptions between the two countries.

Several Irish parents subsequently contacted committee members after the letter was made public, expressing concern that pending adoptions for Russian children might be canceled.

Pat Breen, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, said Thursday that lawmakers had decided to scrap the Magnitsky list and instead pass a motion calling on the government to convey the committee's concern over the death.

"We have reached a motion that fulfils our obligations on human rights," he said, according to The Irish Times.

One senator, David Norris, told the committee that the Russian government should be "thoroughly ashamed" for "this use of children," while Jim Walsh, the senator who proposed the blacklist, expressed disappointment that no sanctions would be enacted, the newspaper said. "But," Walsh added, "politics is about achieving compromise."

In Moscow, Vladimir Kara-Murza, a senior opposition member, minced no words in his criticism of Ireland and the Russian government.

"The effect is unambiguous: Ireland, the current president of the European Union, succumbed to the Kremlin's blackmail and threats," Kara-Murza said in an interview with the French radio station RFI. "It is with deep regret that it must be said that the blackmail of Putin's regime has worked."

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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