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St. Pete Jazz Scene Mourns Loss of Pioneer

Published: January 16, 2014 (Issue # 1793)



  • Natan Leites carries an American flag at Pulkovo Airport to welcome jazz musician Wynton Marsalis to St. Petersburg in 1999.
    Photo: for SPT

Jazz promoter Natan Leites, who was a fixture on the Leningrad and St. Petersburg jazz scene for more than 50 years, died at the age of 76 on Dec. 30, 2013. He was cremated on Jan. 5.

For nearly 50 years, Leites headed the Kvadrat Jazz Club, Russias oldest surviving jazz association, which organized concerts and festivals, produced albums, held lectures and published a typewritten magazine containing information about jazz music at a time when it was officially discouraged by the Soviet state.

A true jazz aficionado, Leites was at the center of everything that happened on the local scene, inspiring and educating generations of musicians.

I first came across something resembling jazz music at the Mayak Club on Krasnaya (now Galernaya) Ulitsa, Leites said in an interview with The St. Petersburg Times in 1997. They played music there starting from the Stalin era at some dance nights and stuff.

The trendiest and best-known was a band led by [Izrail] Atlas. Generally, people danced a lot after the war, in the 1950s and the early and mid-1960s. It became a growth medium for so-called Leftfield ensembles. I heard something of the kind for the first time in around 1952.

I became acquainted with [genuine] jazz in the late 1950s; I thought it was good music, I liked it even if it had been terribly abused [by the Soviet authorities] since the early 1950s, especially after [Viktor] Gorodinskys book called Music of Spiritual Poverty, which came out in 1951.

The conversation took place at Leites small apartment in the only Khrushchev-style building on Kazanskaya Ulitsa, which was packed with all sorts of audio equipment, records, tapes, books, magazines and manuscripts.

According to Leites, he was not a political dissident, being first and foremost attracted to the music, rather than to its political overtones.

I was quite a red or pink person at least I believed in socialism, he said.

Too many now say that they opened their eyes awfully early. It couldnt be so. The whole country was in a kind of jar. Only diplomats went abroad, no-one else.

In school you were taught that the steam-engine was invented by the [Russian engineers] Cherepanovs, that all things were done by Soviets or Russians, that we lived better than anyone, because we had no unemployment. We saw nothing.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Oct. 22


English teachers can expect to receive a few useful pointers today from Evgeny Kalashnikov, the British Council regional teacher, during the EFL Seminar this afternoon hosted by the British Book Center. The topic of todays seminar is Grammar Practice.


Young Petersburgers will get the chance to jumpstart their careers at Professional Growth, a job fair and forum featuring more than 40 major Russian and international companies vying for potential candidates for future positions. The forum not only is a chance to network but also to learn more about the modern business world and to understand what it takes to get the job you want.



Thursday, Oct. 23


AmChams Public Relations Committee meeting is scheduled to meet this morning at 9 a.m. in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center.


Sportsmen get their chance to stock up on all kinds of gear at the Hunting and Fishing 2014 exhibition starting today at Lenexpo. Everything from rods and reels to boats, motorcycles and equipment for underwater hunting will be on sale so that any avid outdoorsman can always be prepared.



Friday, Oct. 24


SPIBAs ongoing Breakfast with the Director series continues today, featuring Tomas Hajek, Managing Director of the Northwest Division at Danone Russia. Hajek will be discussing collaborations between businesses from different cultures. The meeting is at 9 a.m. at the Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel and all who wish to attend must confirm their participation by Oct. 23.


Get your gong on at Sounds of the Universe, a concert at the city planetarium this evening incorporating six different gongs to create relaxing songs that will transport you upwards into the stratosphere. Tickets are 700 rubles ($17).



Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop culture, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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