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Geographia: A Culinary Discovery

Geographia // 5 Ulitsa Rubinshteina // Tel. 340 0074 // Open 11 a.m. until the last guest leaves. // Dinner for two with alcohol 3,980 rubles ($120.56)

Published: January 15, 2014 (Issue # 1793)



  • Despite the lack of natural light, the windowless interior is comfortable and resists seeming claustrophobic.
    Photo: VKontakte

The latest eatery to open on Ulitsa Rubinshteina, Geographia is a cut above the rest, single-handedly raising the tone of a street that frequently offers more choice than quality. Of the street’s handful of truly enjoyable restaurants, Geographia now tops the list of places that deserve a second visit.

Visiting early on a quiet evening over the new year holidays, the true character of the place was not yet in evidence. What we did find was a calm, elegant and modern oasis that was at once welcoming and familiar.

Ushered into the back dining room ­ — a windowless chamber that is tranquil and plush — we settled into a wide, comfortable booth. With walls covered in a burgundy red painted paneling and herringbone tweed and red seat coverings accented with a band of electric blue, the room is furnished with a beautiful hexagonal table at its center and resists seeming claustrophobic despite the lack of natural light.

The menu at Geographia presents a mix of Asian inflected dishes that treads a fine line between fusion and classicism. The wine list is one of the best we have come across in a long while and the selections by the glass are all appealing. While waiting for glasses of a 2010 Billaud-Simon Petit Chablis (390 rubles, $11.81), we skimmed the concise menu finding it hard to choose from the delights on offer — but choose we did.

For starters, a Greek salad (320 rubles, $9.69) seemed like a good way to find out what the kitchen was capable of, requiring as it does a certain amount of restraint and the highest quality ingredients to make it sing. What arrived was a wide and shallow black bowl filled with a mix of greens, roasted peppers and tomatoes with an herb-covered slab of rustic feta. To keep the salad from being over dressed or wilting, the sauce was presented in a footed shot glass. While not strictly traditional in flavor it was, however, delicious.

The next appetizer to emerge from the kitchen was a roasted beetroot carpaccio with a house-made cheese (290 rubles, $8.78). Expecting a pinwheel of crimson discs on a plate, it was a pleasant surprise to be presented with five slices of beetroot folded around a creamily delicious cheese perched atop a bed of arugula and tomatoes. Presented on a wooden cutting board covered with a piece of butcher’s paper, the beets were slightly charred and perfectly complimented by the creamy cheese and a tiny dash of fresh horseradish topping each Agnolotti-shaped bite.

For mains we selected for lamb chops (850 rubles, $25.75) and a steamed sea bass (640 rubles, $19.39). The fish apparently changes with what is available in the market but we were pleased with the bass, which was the platonic idea of clean simplicity, steamed in a banana leaf and served a slightly spicy Thai tomato sauce. The lamb arrived atop a trio red and yellow roasted peppers and was perfectly rosy on the inside and crusted with a blend of spices that included black pepper, garlic and coriander. The lamb was accompanied by two violently colored sauces — one red and one green — which suited the meat perfectly. A plate of grilled vegetables (240 rubles, $7.27) that included tiny new potatoes, peppers and eggplant were cooked to perfection and provided just enough of a side to share.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.







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