Thursday, November 27, 2014
 
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Dom: If Walls Could Talk

Dom // 72 Moika River Embankment // Tel. 930 72 72 // Sun-Thurs: 12.30 p.m. – 11 p.m., // Fri-Sat: 12 p.m. – 1 a.m. // Dinner for two with alcohol: 3000 rubles // ($89.30). English menu available.

Published: January 22, 2014 (Issue # 1794)



  • Dom maintains the intimate and familial atmosphere of a private home.
    Photo: rest-dom.ru

There is something about the atmosphere at Dom. Like many of the historical buildings around the city, you can sense the history, the soul within the walls, no matter how much the interior may have changed over the decades. Such is the feeling at Dom that the beautifully renovated 19th-century style interior does little to shake off the feeling that something went down here…and it turns out, indeed it did.

Maintaining the layout of a house, you can choose to enjoy a drink at the bar first, join other diners in a brightly lit and spacious living room, or settle in within the small, cozy red-walled library. We chose the library after finding out that it was under this roof poet Kondraty Ryleyev, one of the leaders of the Decembrist uprising, lived. Along with other members of the group, it was here in this house that they planned the eventual bloody revolt on Dec. 26, 1825. After that snippet of history, the broodiness of the library felt like a good fit.

Noticing our shiny, rosy cheeks from the sub-zero temperatures outside, the waiter was kind enough to serve us an aperitif on the house to warm us up, and to perhaps prepare us for the rather pricey menu he then handed over. Proudly using local produce, the kitchen offers an interesting take on modern Russian cuisine, which could justify the price tag.

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With hot and cold starters offering dishes with mussels, scallops, ox tail and tongue, we ordered a more conservative serving of pumpkin fritters with red caviar and sour cream (550 rubles, $16.40). The soft fritters turned out to be more of a mash but this didn’t affect the taste — it was just more awkward to share. Topped with sour cream, the saltiness of the caviar played nicely with the sweetness of the pumpkin.

Traditional Russian salads such as Olivier, vinaigrette and dressed herring, along with soups such as borsch, ukha and shchi are all on offer. However, we decided to skip these and instead complement our sweet red Argentinian Malbec wine (350 rubles a glass, $10.42) with a grilled quail and berry ragout (850 rubles, $25.30) and rabbit pelmeni (450 rubles, $13.40).

Other dishes on the menu wrestling for our attention included roe deer fillet with warm pear and buckthorn sauce (1500 rubles, $44.65) Guinea fowl with stewed rice and truffle oil (1200 rubles, $35.70) and stewed duck leg with plum confit (790 rubles, $23.50).

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg’s showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the team’s website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literature’s most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poet’s birthday. The tragic tenor’s work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russia’s greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test one’s intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



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