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Oxfam Ranks Russia 44th on World Food Ranking

Published: January 26, 2014 (Issue # 1794)



  • Scoring fairly high on the availability of food, Russia lost points on food quality and steep prices.
    Photo: Mikhail Orlov / Flickr

Russia ranked No. 44 in a recent survey of the best — and worst — places to eat among 125 of the world's countries: There is plenty of food to go around, but the quality and prices leave something to be desired.

The survey by Oxfam International — a UK-based global network fighting hunger and poverty — rated the countries based on food availability, prices, quality and the health outcomes of people's diets.

The Netherlands offers the best meals of all, according to the survey released earlier this month. The top 10 places to eat in the world also include France, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Ireland, Italy and Portugal.

The worst place to eat is Chad. The African country has some of highest children's malnutrition rates in the world, and the food is often prepared in unsanitary conditions and without access to clean drinking water.

You may also be interested in: Watchdog Cooks Up Surprise Food Inspections

Other places that culinary tourists might like to avoid are Angola, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Yemen, Niger, Burundi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Sierra Leone. Along with Chad, they made up the world's 10 worst places to dine — or have lunch or breakfast, for that matter.

Britain, the U.S and Canada ranked 13th, 21st and 25th, respectively — largely because of those countries' struggles with obesity, diabetes and unhealthy eating habits.

Among the former Soviet republics, Ukraine came in 33rd and Belarus ranked 57th. Of the Caucasus regions, renowned among many Russians for their cuisine, Armenia came in 57th, and Azerbaijan ranked 91st, mostly set back by doubts about its sanitary standards and its high food prices. Georgia was not included in the rating.

Memoir Reveals True Taste of Soviet Life

Russia came in 44th, scoring fairly high on the availability of food, with few people going hungry. But it lost points for food quality, fairly high levels of diabetes and obesity, and steep prices.





 


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Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg’s showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the team’s website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literature’s most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poet’s birthday. The tragic tenor’s work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russia’s greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test one’s intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



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