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Oxfam Ranks Russia 44th on World Food Ranking

Published: January 26, 2014 (Issue # 1794)



  • Scoring fairly high on the availability of food, Russia lost points on food quality and steep prices.
    Photo: Mikhail Orlov / Flickr

Russia ranked No. 44 in a recent survey of the best — and worst — places to eat among 125 of the world's countries: There is plenty of food to go around, but the quality and prices leave something to be desired.

The survey by Oxfam International — a UK-based global network fighting hunger and poverty — rated the countries based on food availability, prices, quality and the health outcomes of people's diets.

The Netherlands offers the best meals of all, according to the survey released earlier this month. The top 10 places to eat in the world also include France, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Ireland, Italy and Portugal.

The worst place to eat is Chad. The African country has some of highest children's malnutrition rates in the world, and the food is often prepared in unsanitary conditions and without access to clean drinking water.

You may also be interested in: Watchdog Cooks Up Surprise Food Inspections

Other places that culinary tourists might like to avoid are Angola, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Yemen, Niger, Burundi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Sierra Leone. Along with Chad, they made up the world's 10 worst places to dine — or have lunch or breakfast, for that matter.

Britain, the U.S and Canada ranked 13th, 21st and 25th, respectively — largely because of those countries' struggles with obesity, diabetes and unhealthy eating habits.

Among the former Soviet republics, Ukraine came in 33rd and Belarus ranked 57th. Of the Caucasus regions, renowned among many Russians for their cuisine, Armenia came in 57th, and Azerbaijan ranked 91st, mostly set back by doubts about its sanitary standards and its high food prices. Georgia was not included in the rating.

Memoir Reveals True Taste of Soviet Life

Russia came in 44th, scoring fairly high on the availability of food, with few people going hungry. But it lost points for food quality, fairly high levels of diabetes and obesity, and steep prices.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Jan. 26


Feeling stressed by the crisis? The Northwest Coach University at 3 Ulitsa Vostsstanaya is hosting a master class by lifecoach Tatiana Almazova. She will shed light on the coaching process, the usefulness of coaching during times of economic downturn and how coaching can improve your career and business prospects. The event starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Pre-register by calling 424 3700.



Discover the State Hermitage Museum's collection of English painting at a lecture by art historian Yelizaveta Renne at the Prince Galitzine Library, 46 Nab. Reki Fontanki. The event starts at 6 p.m. and the lecture will be followed by a concert of arias, songs and duets by English composer Henry Purcell. The event is free of charge.



Tuesday, Jan. 27


Celebrate the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.







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