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Cirque du Soleils Multiculti Universe (photo gallery)

Published: January 29, 2014 (Issue # 1795)



  • Dralion features an international cast, including a St. Petersburg native.
    Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil

  • Contortionists.
    Photo: Daniel Desmarais / Cirque du Soleil

  • Hoop performers.
    Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil


  • Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil


  • Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil


  • Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil


  • Photo: Mark Delong / Cirque du Soleil


  • Photo: Daniel Demarais / Cirque du Soleil

  • Little Buddha.
    Photo: Mark Delong / Cirque du Soleil

Cirque du Soleil is back in St. Petersburg with an arena show titled Dralion. Opening on Jan. 22, the extravagant show has proven popular with local audiences, easily filling the Ice Palace arena, which has become the troupes home when visiting the city.

The title of the show is a portmanteau of the two emblematic creatures whose images run throughout the performance: The dragon, symbolizing the East, and the lion, symbolizing the West. A slightly promiscuous blend of influences, Dralion combines the 3,000-year old tradition of Chinese acrobatic arts with the multidisciplinary approach of Cirque du Soleil but nonetheless offers enough thematically-linked elements to bring the various influences together.

When Dralion was created almost 15 years ago, Cirque du Soleil had wanted to find a way of combining ancient Chinese circus traditions with their contemporary approach and Dralion was the result of that, Mark Shaub, the shows artistic director, told the St. Petersburg Times. When you see the entire show there are a lot of other acts the clowns are definitely not Chinese so its a real melding of the different influences.

As with almost all Cirque productions, the evening begins long before most of the audience have found their seats with a trio of roving clowns causing general mayhem, drawing audience members into the world of the performers.

The show proper starts when a character known as Little Buddha, who acts as a timekeeper, sets the first act in motion.

Drawing inspiration from Eastern philosophy and the quest for harmony between man and nature, Dralion gives human form to the four elements Air, Water, Fire and Earth each of which are identified with a different part of the globe. Each act is overseen by one of the elements whose origin is revealed through costume and music.

The music is really from all over the world. There are influences of Arabic music, Spanish music we do a lot of world music blends. Certainly there is a big element of Asia and particularly Chinese traditions, but it really blends together, said Shaub.

Directed by Guy Caron, who was Cirque du Soleils first artistic director when the company was created in 1984, the show has been seen by more than 7 million people worldwide since it premiered in 1999. The St. Petersburg run is the Russian premiere of the show, which will be followed by performances in Chelyabinsk, Kazan and Moscow before heading to Minsk.

The show features 50 international acrobats, gymnasts, musicians and singers, several of whom are Russian, including a St. Petersburg native.

While parts of the Dralion mythology feel somewhat dated, it is nonetheless a spectacular display of prowess on the part of the performers one that is often as breathtaking in the quieter moments as it is during the big production numbers. With the Russian love and knowledge of circus traditions, Cirque seems to have managed to create quite a few converts to its worldview.

Daily performances of Dralion run through Feb. 2, with matinees on the weekend, at the Ice Palace, 1aProspekt Pyatiletok. M. Prospekt Bolshevikov. Tel. 718 6620.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, July 30


SPIBA continues their series of Look@It tours, which focus on the success stories of major brands in the St. Petersburg market. Todays event will focus on the Gorky Golf Club and will also be held there. For more details visit spiba.ru



Thursday, July 31


Develop your leadership abilities during a lecture by famous Russian author and coach Radislav Gandapas. The event starts at 9 a.m. at 5 Lodeinopolskaya Ulitsa. The price for entry is 20,500 rubles ($570).


Relax and enjoy a Parisian atmosphere with some romantic and laidback jazz tunes during the Night of French Music at Lenny Jam Cafe, 63 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 250 rubles ($7).


The Womens Business Club is hosting a Beauty Brunch where participants are invited to discuss the latest news in the beauty industry and listen to lectures by professional stylists in the business.



Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldnt miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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