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Putting It All Together

Published: January 29, 2014 (Issue # 1795)


Слитно или раздельно: one word or two

I love to read articles and books designed to help native Russian speakers negotiate the trickier aspects of the great and mighty Russian language. One of my favorite problems is the question of слитно (written together in one word) or раздельно (written separately as two words). There are entire books devoted to this topic, which is worth mastering, since the meaning of the words depends on how you write them.

Sometimes the distinction is quite dramatic. Take the word купе (compartment, as in a train). Мы поместили вещи в купе и вышли из вагона покурить (We put our things in our compartment and then got off the train to smoke).

В купе (in the compartment) is different from the less colloquial вкупе, an adverb that means together, in harmony, in coordination with: В иностранных языках и в словарях слово “интеллигенция” переводится, как правило, не само по себе, а вкупе с прилагательным “русская” (In foreign languages and dictionaries the word “intelligentsia” is usually not translated by itself but in conjunction with the adjective “Russian”). You might also see вкупе on wedding banners: вкупе и влюбе (in perfect harmony).

In other cases, the distinction is a bit more subtle, like ввиду and в виду. Ввиду is a preposition that takes the genitive case and means “in view of, due to, in light of.” Today it is probably most often found in what Russians call канцелярский язык (bureaucratese, business Russian).

Using it makes me feel like Miss Murchison typing away in a Dorothy Sayers novel: Ввиду морозов школы закрывают (In light of the cold temperatures, schools are closed). Производство по делу об административном правонарушении прекратили ввиду отсутствия состава правонарушения (The investigation of an administrative violation was closed due to the absence of violation). Well, maybe Kafka is a better comparison here, but you get the idea.

In any case, ввиду is distinct from в виду, a phrase that combines the preposition “в” with the noun вид (view) in the locative case, and means “in viewing distance of, close to.” It’s not used too much in this way: Корабль плыл в виду берега. (The ship sailed close to the shore, literally within viewing distance of the shore). But it is used very frequently in a standard expression, иметь в виду (to have in mind; literally to have in view). This is what you say when you aren’t sure you understood someone: Что ты имеешь в виду? (What did you mean by that? What did you have in mind?)

And finally there is навстречу and на встречу. The former refers to something coming from the opposite direction: Машина ехала навстречу (The car was approaching [as we moved toward it]). Sometimes this is figurative: Понимая ваше положение, мы готовы пойти вам навстречу (We understand your situation and are willing to meet you halfway). Or sometimes literal: Если пойдём навстречу друг другу, то мы встретимся в парке. (If we walk toward each other, we’ll meet in the park).

But на встречу means “to a meeting” and refers to a specific get-together. Её пригласили на встречу со студентами (She was invited to meet with students).

And both навстречу and на встречу are different from встречка, a slang word that means either the oncoming lane of traffic or the illegal zipping into that lane. So if your Russian friend suggests that you двигаться ему навстречу in order to go на встречу, don’t try to do it по встречке.

Michele A. Berdy, a Moscow-based translator and interpreter, is the author of “The Russian Word’s Worth” (Glas), a collection of her columns.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, July 30


SPIBA continues their series of Look@It tours, which focus on the success stories of major brands in the St. Petersburg market. Today’s event will focus on the Gorky Golf Club and will also be held there. For more details visit spiba.ru



Thursday, July 31


Develop your leadership abilities during a lecture by famous Russian author and coach Radislav Gandapas. The event starts at 9 a.m. at 5 Lodeinopolskaya Ulitsa. The price for entry is 20,500 rubles ($570).


Relax and enjoy a Parisian atmosphere with some romantic and laidback jazz tunes during the Night of French Music at Lenny Jam Cafe, 63 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 250 rubles ($7).


The Women’s Business Club is hosting a Beauty Brunch where participants are invited to discuss the latest news in the beauty industry and listen to lectures by professional stylists in the business.



Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldn’t miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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