Friday, October 31, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

  Print this article Print this article

Lenins Law Applied to Dozhd TV

Published: January 5, 2014 (Issue # 1796)


Thesensation was online coverage about events that took place 70 years ago: Thesiege ofLeningrad during World War II. Dozhd TV asked their viewers toanswer aquestion: Should Leningrad have surrendered tothe Nazis tosave thousands oflives? Thesurvey was not even over before all hell broke loose. Through Twitter, Culture MinisterVladimir Medinskywrote, They are not human, referring tothe Dozhd journalists who thought up thepoll.

Theincident was discussed bythe St. Petersburg Legislative Assembly, where theinfamous opponent ofliberalism andtolerance, deputy Vitaly Milonov, demonstrated his ownintolerance. I am astonished that 54 percent ofthe cretins who watch Dozhd TV said, Yes, Leningrad should have surrendered. Apack ofhyenas! Milonov said.

Authorities admitted that Dozhd TV did not break any laws byrunning acontroversial poll onthe Leningrad blockade. But atthe same time, they argue thestation violated moral andethical laws.

Atthe initiative ofthe Legislative Assembly, theSt. Petersburg prosecutors office began toinvestigate whether thetelevision station had demonstrated extremism, acrime that is punishable bya five-year jail term. Inlight ofthis serious threat, Dozhd TV managers sent out memos tothe staff onhow tobehave during asearch.

Thesiege ofLeningrad is certainly one ofthe most painful events ofWorld War II andone with many unanswered questions tobe sure. More civilians died during thesiege atleast 630,000 than British andFrench soldiers together died over theentire course ofthe war. Historians have also tried tounderstand why food supply lines tothe city were organized so poorly, especially incomparison with theblockade ofWest Berlin from1948 to1949. Thehistory ofthe siege cannot be told without thestories ofheroism bythe citys defenders or without horrible stories ofvile human behavior, like thesumptuous feasts enjoyed bycity party leadership.

Despite all ofthe noise around theDozhd TV scandal, none ofthis is news. Even grade school textbooks ask children todiscuss almost theexact same question posed byDozhd TV. SatiristViktor Shenderovichwas right when he said inan interview onEkho Moskvy: The survey was just apretext, ofcourse. It was just adespicable pretext, noting that thereal reason forthe scandal lies inDozhd TVs independent editorial policy.

Dozhd TV is unique inRussia. It is not broadcast over theair but is only available onthe Internet or via satellite or cable providers. It is unique inanother way. It is theonly television station inRussia today without censorship andwithout ablacklist ofpeople who cannot be invited intothe studio. There are no forbidden topics either. Thestation gives much airtime toRussias human rights violations, provides balanced reporting onprotests inKiev andhas not been afraid toreport oncorruption atthe highest echelons ofpower.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



Times Talk