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Ukraines Take on Why East Is East

Published: February 5, 2014 (Issue # 1796)


: Eastern backwardness (derogatory)

I came across aninteresting exchange online incomments about aseries ofdramatic photos ofdemonstrations inKiev. Someone, presumably Russian, asked with admiration anda dose ofcondescension: - ? (And what do those valiant Ukrainians want?) Theanswer, presumably fromone ofthose valiant Ukrainians, was dry but tothe point: (We want tobreak with Eastern culture andthe Soviet mentality).

Well, that was thegist ofit, but required abit ofresearch.

Like all words ending inthe suffix /- that denote thecharacteristics ofa place, philosophy or people, is derogatory. So you know right away that it means all thebad stuff connected with Asia. But what bad stuff andwhere inAsia?

Also by this author: My Resolutions for 2014

One dictionary defines neutrally: , , (the way ofthings, theway oflife andbehavior characteristic ofAsians). But theother dictionaries I consulted are far fromneutral anddefine it as , , (lack ofculture, cultural backwardness, crudeness). Andone dictionary fromthe turn ofthe 20th century was extremely clear: , .. ; (the opposite ofEuropean customs that is, crude; theabsence ofcivilization). Yikes. Makes you appreciate (political correctness).

But I still did not know what part ofAsia was meant or, more important, what connotes toaverage folks today. So I started asking around. Formost people, refers tothe Eastern parts ofthe former Russian Empire andSoviet Union theCaucasus andCentral Asia plus theEastern cultures surrounding it tothe south andwest: Turkey andthe Middle East. Everyone excludes theFar East (China, Korea, Japan) andSoutheast Asia (India, Nepal). Some people exclude Georgia or Armenia, presumably because they are Christian.

Also by this author: Words of the Year 2013

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 24


SPIBAs ongoing Breakfast with the Director series continues today, featuring Tomas Hajek, Managing Director of the Northwest Division at Danone Russia. Hajek will be discussing collaborations between businesses from different cultures. The meeting is at 9 a.m. at the Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel and all who wish to attend must confirm their participation by Oct. 23.


Get your gong on at Sounds of the Universe, a concert at the city planetarium this evening incorporating six different gongs to create relaxing songs that will transport you upwards into the stratosphere. Tickets are 700 rubles ($17).



Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop culture, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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