Wednesday, January 28, 2015
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS


Legendary Porcelain Artworks for Your Home
The Gift Projects online showroom...


BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

The Kublitsky-Piotukh Family

Alexander Blok Apartment Museum

 

A Little Bit of This, a Little Bit of That

Published: February 12, 2014 (Issue # 1797)


: buy some cheese

Well pause inour round-the-clock coverage of the Olympic Games fora small commercial break. That means you get off thecouch, stretch andhead forthe kitchen. ? (What do you want?), you ask your significant other. ? ? ? (Some tea? Some cognac? Some chocolate?)

How charming tooffer toget your companion something toeat. How clever ofyou touse thepartitive case.

Thewhat?

Also by this author: A Trip Down Soviet Culinary Lane

Youll be forgiven if you missed this inyour Russian language lessons. Called inRussian (the genitive partitive case), it is anifty way ofindicating some or part ofsomething. With most nouns it is just thestandard genitive case endings andmeans some, alittle, part ofwhatever is being discussed. Forexample, ateenager heading tothe mall tobuy apair ofglasses might approach aparent with ahand extended andthe phrase: ! (Give me some money tobuy glasses). That is thepartitive case. But if said teenager has already ordered theglasses andknows theexact price, therequest would be: (give me themoney forthe glasses).

Also by this author: Words of the Year 2013

This might be one ofthose arcane bits ofRussian grammar that you file away andfigure no one will notice if you get it wrong. That is fine. Except fora list ofabout ahundred Russian words all masculine gender that have aspecial partitive ending: - or inthe singular. Recognizing them is important. Using them makes you sound less like you just got off theboat clutching your Russian-English dictionary. The-/- partitive forms are alittle like Dr. Whos bowties: alittle old-fashioned, alittle dorky, but cool.

Besides, you probably hear or use these forms every day inthe kitchen: (some tea); (some chocolate); (some cheese); (some sugar); (some soup); (some garlic); and (some fat, grease). Or you might use them when you are knocking back some cold ones: (a little cognac); (a bit ofmoonshine); (some grain alcohol).

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



Learn everything you always wanted to know about wine, and perhaps a bit more, at the Le Nez du Vin seminar for wine lovers. Held at the WineJet Sommelier School, 100 Bolshoy Prospekt Petrograd Side, at 7:30 p.m., the event will cover wine production, the basics of wine tasting, the concept of terroir and the various countries where wine is produced. Tickets are 750 rubles and include a wine tasting. Register by calling +7 921 744 6264.



Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of Repulsion at 7 p.m. and Rosemarys Baby at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy The Tenant, the cult comedy The Fearless Vampire Killers and Cul-de-sac among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



Times Talk