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Nothing to Stop the Pain

Published: February 12, 2014 (Issue # 1797)




  • Photo:

Afew days ago, retired Rear Admiral Vyacheslav Apanasenko put anend tohis own life. He earlier helped develop theBulava missile but later struggled with terminal cancer. Although he had little hope ofsurviving, he could have spent his remaining days inthe company offriends andrelatives. Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs died froma similar illness, andhe managed tocontinue working almost right up until theend. Apanasenko preferred shooting himself. Inhis case, euthanasia was preferable tothe treatment provided bythe medical system.

Euthanasia is illegal inRussia, but it remains common practice. Relatives kill their loved ones rather than watch them suffer inagony without painkillers. Patients commit suicide, andone patient even killed his doctor who was prolonging his torment before taking his own life.

News reports have been rather vague inexplaining Apanasenkos cause ofdeath. Thenewspaper Rossiiskaya Gazeta reported only that he had aserious case ofcancer andexperienced difficulty obtaining painkillers. But his daughter gave amore dramatic description ofthe situation ina Facebook post:

Papa had late-stage pancreatic cancer, she wrote. He courageously endured thepain. Mama tried toobtain themorphine he had been prescribed. Toget afive-day supply ofvials, forseveral days she had torun fromoffice tooffice inthe medical center forhours ata time. Onthe final day, she was short ofone signature when themedical center closed. She came home completely burned out andwithout theanesthetics. Papa was outraged. This was thelast straw. That night he got everything ready andleft anote clearly stating his reasons. I ask that you not blame anyone except theHealth Ministry andthe government. I am prepared tosuffer, but it is intolerable tosee my loved ones suffer. He wrote thetime anddate andsigned it. Then he took his prized pistol. I think that with this act he wanted todraw attention tohow cancer patients are treated inRussia.

TheFederal Drug Control Service headed byViktor Ivanov, alongtime associate ofPresidentVladimir Putin, created this inhumane system forcontrolling theissuance ofpainkillers.

Terminally ill patients andthose insevere pain must navigate ahellish bureaucracy toobtain even five vials ofpotent painkillers. Then, they must return theunused vials andbottle labels after thepatient has died. Not only is it difficult andfrustrating toget theclinic staff tosign off onthe returned items, but therelatives are held criminally responsible forfailing todo so even if they have accidentally lost them. Cancer patients are assigned toa single pharmacy that works with themedical center or cancer clinic inquestion. If that pharmacy does not have themedicines forwhatever reason, thepatient is left toscream inpain or die ofshock. Insome cases, individuals with late-stage cancer must personally appear toreceive aprescription forthe medicines that can relieve their suffering. Long weekends or holidays become aliving nightmare forpatients andtheir relatives because each prescription covers only ashort period andregulations make it impossible tostock up inadvance.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Tuesday, Jan. 27


Observe the 71st anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad on Palace Square with a free concert at 7 p.m. Listen to WWII-era songs and the poetry of Olga Bergholz while you peruse outdoor exhibitions dedicated to life during wartime. The event is capped off by a fireworks display at 9 p.m.



Stop by the Lexica School of Foreign Languages at 73 Ligovsky Prospekt from now until Friday for a free English lesson. The classes start at 7 p.m. and cover all levels, from Beginner to Advanced. Registration by telephone on 7641692 and a desire to improve your skills are the only prerequisites.



Wednesday, Jan. 28



Feel like becoming a publishing mogul? Stop by the Freedom anti-cafe at 7 Ulitsa Kazanskaya today at 8 p.m. where Simferopol, Crimea-based founder and chief editor of the Holst online magazine will talk about creating an internet magaine, including what stories to cover, how find an audience and build a team, where to find inspiration and how to stand out from the crowd. Admission is the normal price of the anti-café 2 rubles per minute, which includes tea and snacks.



Learn everything you always wanted to know about wine, and perhaps a bit more, at the Le Nez du Vin seminar for wine lovers. Held at the WineJet Sommelier School, 100 Bolshoy Prospekt Petrograd Side, at 7:30 p.m., the event will cover wine production, the basics of wine tasting, the concept of terroir and the various countries where wine is produced. Tickets are 750 rubles and include a wine tasting. Register by calling +7 921 744 6264.



Thursday, Jan. 29



Attend a master class on how to deal with complicated business negotiations today at the International Banking Institute, 6 Malaya Sadovaya Ulitsa. Running from 3 to 6 p.m., Vadim Sokolov, an assistant professor at the St. Petersburg State University of Economics, will introduce aspects of managing the negotiation process and increasing its effectiveness. Attendance is free with pre-registration by telephone on 909 3056 or online at www.ibispb.ru



Celebrate what would be writer Anton Chekhov's 155th birthday at the Bokvoed bookshop at 46 Nevsky Prospekt. Starting at 5 p.m., the legendary author will be feted with readings of his stories and short performances based on his plays by various St. Petersburg actors. Chekhov's books will also be offered at a 15% discount during the event.



Friday, Jan. 30



The Lermontov Central Library, 19 Liteyny Prospekt, will screen 'Almost Famous in English with Russian subtitles at 6:30 p.m. Cameron Crowe's Academy Award-winning comedy from 2000 stars Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, and Patrick Fugit, and tells the story of a budding music journalist at Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s. Admission is free.



Meet renowned Russian poet, journalist and writer Dmitry Bykov, famous for his biographies of Boris Pasternak, Bulat Okudzhava and Maxim Gorky, and winner of 2006 National Bestseller Award. Bykov will read old and new poems as well as answer questions about his works at the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, Main Hall, at 7 p.m. Tickets start at 1,000 rubles and are available at city ticket offices and the from the Philharmonic website www.philharmonia.spb.ru.



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of Repulsion at 7 p.m. and Rosemarys Baby at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy The Tenant, the cult comedy The Fearless Vampire Killers and Cul-de-sac among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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