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Pro-Russia Armed Men Hold Crimea Government Buildings Under Seize

Published: February 28, 2014 (Issue # 1799)



  • The Crimean parliament was taken over by armed men early Thursday morning.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

A group of armed men seized the Crimean Parliament and Council of Ministers buildings in the Ukrainian city of Simferopol on Wednesday night.

Russian flags are hoisted on top of the buildings, Interfax reported, adding that local sources told them that the men are part of a spontaneously "self-defense" unit formed by the region's Russian-speaking population. A flag reading "Crimea Russia" in Russian hangs on barricades outside the building's entrance.

Related: Tensions in Ukraine Grow Amid Russian Military Drills

Following the ousting of Kremlin ally and former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych from his post last Saturday, the predominantly pro-Russian Crimea has been divided between Russian separatists and ethnic Tatars who support the new Ukrainian government. In addition to ethnic ties, Russia also maintains a Black Sea naval base in the Crimean city of Sevastopol.

The invaders have not yet issued any demands since seizing the buildings around 4 a.m. Crimean Prime Minister Anatoly Mogilev reportedly tried to conduct negotiations with the unknown men, but was unsuccessful.

Mogilev said that the men do not want to enter into negotiations or explain the reasons for their actions, but that members of the Supreme Council of Crimea were being allowed into the building. An unidentified Crimean government official told Interfax Thursday afternoon that a meeting of the parliament at 2 p.m. local time would discuss greater autonomy for the region.

The scene outside the building turned to one of pro-Russia support in the mid-afternoon, as between 300 and 400 young people with Russian flags crossed police lines and began shouting "Russia! Russia!" ahead of a the planned parliamentary session, Interfax reported. The demonstrations follow larger actions by both pro- and anti-Russia groups in front of the parliament on Wednesday, which turned into violent clashes between the two groups.

No one was injured in the building takeover, Mogilev's press secretary said. The surrounding area has been sealed off by police, and a work holiday has been declared in the city.

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Friday, Nov. 28


Join table-top game aficionados at the British Book Center’s Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test one’s intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only man’s best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during today’s reenactment titled “Winter War: How it Was.” More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie “Black Cat, White Cat,” as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of “Takoy Festival,” a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonight’s festival finale is “Fathers and Sons,” a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenev’s classic about familial relations.



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