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Ukraine Shackled by Revolution and Oligarchs

Published: March 5, 2014 (Issue # 1800)


Many people see theUkrainian uprising as adirect result ofa sort ofdoubles match that paired ousted Presidents Vladimir Putin andViktor Yanukovych against German Chancellor Angela Merkel andEuropean Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso. Others suspect that Washington instigated theturmoil. But if we clear thehaze surrounding thecrisis, then suddenly we can see that thereal root ofthe problem lies buried deep beneath thesurface: anintricate web woven byUkraines wealthiest business leaders.

It would be amistake tothink that Ukraine wants torepeat Russias accomplishments andYanukovych sought toreplicate Putins success as apowerful leader. Even though thetwo countries share asimilar language andculture, their political systems are vastly different, especially when it comes tothe part played bywealth businessmen ininfluencing politics.

Bythe late 2000s, theoperative influence ofbillionaires ondaily politics had almost completely vanished inRussia, mainly aresult ofmeasures taken byPutin. Clear examples ofthose measures include the10-year imprisonment ofRussias once most wealthy man, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, andthe banishment ofone-time Kremlin powerbroker Boris Berezovsky intoself-exile andapparent suicide inBritain. While Russian billionaires visibly controlled politics via the Family atthe end ofthe Boris Yeltsin era, Putin systematically destroyed their influence byappointing siloviki, who have controlled Russia forthe past decade.

Incontrast with Russia, Ukraine has established afairly unique political system after the1991 dissolution ofthe Soviet Union. Similarly toRussia, several billionaires andtheir clans have emerged due tothe unaccountable andfast privatization offormer state assets under President Leonid Kuchma during the1990s. Dominant clans fromDonetsk, Dnipropetrovsk andKiev have appeared inmetallurgy, banking, energy andother industries.

Bythe early 2000s, Kuchmas presidential powers began tofade thanks toa status quo-based system that lacked reform. That is why thelast few years ofhis regime are known income circles as theKuchma vapidity.

Enter anunexpected andinteresting turn ofevents. In2004, Ukrainian voters elected apresident, Viktor Yushchenko, who was out ofthe reach ofthe clans influence. Yushchenko, with his independence, patriotism andradical anti-corruption andanti-Russian attitude, became asignificant threat tothe billionaires who controlled Ukrainian politics. Yushchenkos supporters were mere businessmen fromthe western part ofUkraine: small fry compared tobillionaires such as Rinat Akhmetov andDmytro Firtash. This is exactly what proved tobe Yushchenkos undoing. He only had thesupport ofthe masses but barely any financial or political support fromthe ruling elite. That disadvantage proved tobe quite costly inan oligarch-controlled nation such as Ukraine.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburgs showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the teams website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literatures most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poets birthday. The tragic tenors work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russias greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Centers Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test ones intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only mans best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during todays reenactment titled Winter War: How it Was. More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie Black Cat, White Cat, as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of Takoy Festival, a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonights festival finale is Fathers and Sons, a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenevs classic about familial relations.



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