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Top 5 Myths About Russias Invasion of Crimea

Published: February 12, 2014 (Issue # 1801)


Although it is well known that thefirst victim ofnearly every military intervention is thetruth, Russia seems tohave broken all records inthis category. Here are thetop five Kremlin myths about Russias invasion ofCrimea:

1. There was no invasion.

Media fromall over theworld have reported testimony fromsoldiers inCrimean cities who are dressed andarmed exactly like those inthe Russian army minus theinsignia. They have seized airports, border crossings andadministrative buildings, andare pressuring Ukrainian soldiers stationed inCrimea tosurrender. Nonetheless, President Vladimir Putin insists that theestimated 15,000 soldiers who have seized Crimea are local Crimean self-defense forces.

Putin has also said that theFederation Councils authorization onMarch 1 ofmilitary intervention inCrimea has not been executed yet. Whats more, Putin said last week during ameeting with journalists that thesimilarity between theuniforms ofthe Crimean self-defense forces andthe Russian army can be explained bythe fact that is easy tobuy those uniforms inany clothing store. Putin didnt clarify, however, if these self-defense forces also bought thearmored personnel carriers fitted with Russian military license plates, which were spotted inseveral Crimean cities, atthese clothing stores as well.

Putins explanations have thesame credibility ofa 5-year-old boy who left thetop tothe cookie jar open andhas crumbs all over his face andthen tells his mother, I didnt eat any cookies!

2. Russians are indanger inCrimea.

There is no evidence that Ukrainians inCrimea andcertainly not Crimean Tatars support Right Sector, Svoboda or other far-right groups whose base ofsupport is limited largely tothe Western regions ofUkraine. Nor is there any evidence, despite Russias claims, ofUkrainian fascists coming toCrimea tocarry out attacks against Russians there. Even agroup ofUkrainian Jewish leaders wrote anopen lettertoPutin onThursday, admonishing theKremlin not toexaggerate thefascist threat inUkraine.

This is arepeat ofRussias provocation inSouth Ossetia andAbkhazia weeks before the2008 Russia-Georgia war broke out. Then, Russias provocation also centered onthe false pretext ofprotecting Russian citizens indanger worked: Georgia fired thefirst shots inthe war. Although Ukrainians have not yet reacted toRussias provocation inCrimea, it is inevitable that atsome point Ukrainians will be forced toreact toRussias aggression, particularly if Russia decides touse its weapons onUkrainian troops inthe peninsula. Once thefirst shots are fired, it is aslippery slope toa protracted andbloody military conflict between Russia andUkraine that would likely drag inoutside powers.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Nov. 27


The Customs and Transportation Committee for AmCham meets this morning at 9 a.m. in their office on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.


Tickets are still available for local KHL team SKA St. Petersburgs showdown with Siberian club Metallurg Novokuznetsk tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Ice Palace outside the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. Tickets can be purchased on the teams website, at the arena box office or in their merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.


Celebrate one of Russian literatures most tragic figures during Blok Days, a two-day celebration of the 134th anniversary of the poets birthday. The tragic tenors work, which led to writer Maxim Gorky to hail him as Russias greatest living poet before his death in 1921, will be recited and meetings and discussions about his contributions to the Silver Age of literature in St. Petersburg will be discussed in the confines of his former residence.



Friday, Nov. 28


Join table game aficionados at the British Book Centers Board Game Evening. Held every Friday at 5 p.m., aficionados and amateurs alike can come take part in a variety of different games that test ones intellect and cunning.



Saturday, Nov. 29


Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and reptiles are just some of the things that will walk and crawl at Lenexpo convention center this weekend as part of Zooshow, a two-day exhibition featuring not only mans best friends but a four-legged fashion show, as well as a food fair that will help pet owners find out more about which kibbles are best for their hungry pets.



Sunday, Nov. 30


Remember the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Russo-Finnish war in 1939 during todays reenactment titled Winter War: How it Was. More than 200 people will take part in recreating the opening salvoes of the battle for the north in Kamenka, a small village situated between Vyborg and St. Petersburg, using authentic equipment and vintage vehicles from the era. The faux battle begins at 2 p.m.



Monday, Dec. 1


Serbia filmmaker Emir Kusturica is the featured guest this evening at the Lensovet Palace of Culture the Petrograd Side. Fans of the director will get the chance to watch his movie Black Cat, White Cat, as well as ask questions about his award-winning filmography. Tickets for the event, which starts at 7 p.m., start at 2,000 rubles ($42.50).



Tuesday, Dec. 2


Today is the final day of Takoy Festival, a three-week program of plays based on the works of Dostoevsky, Remarque and other famed European writers, whose work is transcribed for theatrical performances. Tonights festival finale is Fathers and Sons, a two-act drama staged by the Novosibirsk Academic Drama Theater based on Turgenevs classic about familial relations.



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