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Sanctions Loom as U.S. Condemns Russian Troops

Published: March 13, 2014 (Issue # 1801)



  • People protesting against Russia's intervention in Crimea.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. and European Union moved closer to imposing sanctions on Russia on Wednesday, as a discrepancy in a U.S. interpretation of President Vladimir Putin's rhetoric about the Ukrainian crisis opened itself up to Russian attacks.

The U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a nonbinding resolution on Tuesday that condemned the presence of Russian troops in Ukraine and called for sanctions on Russia, including its exclusion from the Group of Eight.

The resolution, echoing last week's bill supporting $1 billion in loan guarantees to Ukraine, urged the administration of President Barack Obama to work with “European allies and other countries to impose visa, financial, trade and other sanctions on senior Russian Federation officials, majority state-owned banks and commercial organizations, and other state agencies, as appropriate.”

Interim Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk was to meet with Obama and the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee later Wednesday, an exchange that reinforces the West's allegiance to the new Ukrainian government.

But with the U.S. set to impose sanctions on Russia as early as next week, a U.S. State Department exposé titled “President Putin's Fiction: 10 False Claims About Ukraine” contains a discrepancy that could be used by Russian authorities to berate the U.S. on its approach to the conflict.

The State Department's breakdown of Putin's “false claims” on Ukraine says the terms of the Feb. 21 agreement gave Ukrainian leader Viktor Yanukovych “24 hours” to sign a bill to return Ukraine to its 2004 Constitution. But the actual agreement gave Yanukovych 48 hours.

“Yanukovych refused to keep his end of the bargain,” the State Department says in the statement published on its website on March 5.

But the Ukrainian parliament, which voted to oust Yanukovych on Feb. 22 — only 24 hours later — did not give him the full 48 hours to fulfill this term of the agreement.

This discrepancy in the State Department's analysis could give credence to Russia's insistence that the opposition failed to implement the Feb. 21 agreement with Yanukovych, further bolstering its claim that Yanukovych's ouster and the current government in Kiev are illegitimate.

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Monday, Nov. 24


Dr. Axel Schulte, Department Head at Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics in Dortmund, Germany, is the featured speaker at the SPIBA Industrial Committee lecture on “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Digitalization of the Supply Chain.” The event begins at 4 p.m. at the Graduate School of Management at 3 Volkohvsky Pereulok and registration is required by Nov. 21 either by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.



Tuesday, Nov. 25


Tag along with AmCham during their “Industrial St. Petersburg” Tour program today. This incarnation of the ongoing series will visit Philip Morris Izhora and include an Environmental Health and Safety Committee meeting.


Find out how to expand your business east during the “Business With China” forum beginning today and concluding tomorrow at the Lenexpo convention center. The largest Russian forum dedicated to business with the Asian giant, topics that will be discussed include logistics, customs clearance, trade financing and many more.



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