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Перевести на русский Перевести на русский

Swedish Film Festival Shines Light On Social Issues, History

Published: March 20, 2014 (Issue # 1802)



  • "Music for one apartment and six drummers" is one of the films on show as part of the festival.
    Photo: tourdefilm.ru

Dmitry Kiselyov, director of the new Russian media conglomerate Rossia Segodnya and accuser of Sweden as an instigator of the initial Ukrainian protests in Kiev, won’t be nearly as excited as Scandinavian film buffs about the upcoming Swedish Film Festival beginning Thursday in St. Petersburg. Now in its second year, the festival includes eight feature-length films and two programs of shorts.

Organized in cooperation with the Consulate General of St. Petersburg as well as Tour de Film, an international festivals agency, the northern nation’s brightest filmmakers and their most recent work will be screened through Mar. 30 at the Rodina Cinema Center.

Shown in Swedish with Russian subtitles, the genres of this year’s participating films range from the political to the criminal, the dramatic to the familial.

The opening film this year is “Avalon,” a dark comedy about an affluent family’s struggles with its own self-denial that won the International Critic’s Award at the Toronto International Film Festival for the 34-year-old up-and-coming director, Axel Petersen, who will be in town to open the festival.

Other films featured at this year’s festival, which hopes to expand across Russian in the future, include Mikael Marcimain’s “Call Girl,” a conspiracy thriller focused on a young girl inducted into the world of high-class prostitution in 1970s Sweden; “Palme,” a documentary about the controversial liberal politician Olof Palme’s assassination in Stockholm in 1986; and “Ice Dragon,” a youthful adventure film which will be presented in St. Petersburg by director Martin Högdahl.

All the films that are scheduled to be shown meet the festival’s criteria of a focus on Sweden’s history as well as a strong desire to address the most important problems afflicting modern society in a country renowned for its efficiency and social balance.

A complete program for the festival can be found on the Tour de Film website as well as on the Rodina Cinema Center website.

Tickets for the movies are 250 rubles ($6.80) for general admission, 200 rubles ($5.45) for students and pensioners, and 100 rubles ($2.75) for children.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Jan. 30 through Wednesday, Feb. 4



A retrospective of the films of Roman Polanski starts today at Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt, with a screening of ‘Repulsion’ at 7 p.m. and ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ at 9:15 p.m. The series runs through Feb. 4 and will include Polanski's eminently creepy ‘The Tenant,’ the cult comedy ‘The Fearless Vampire Killers’ and ‘Cul-de-sac’ among others. Tickets are 150-200 rubles and the complete schedule is available at www.vk.com/artpokaz/



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