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National Geographic to Redraw World Map to Make Crimea Part of Russia

Published: March 20, 2014 (Issue # 1802)



  • National Geographic cartographers have agreed to temporarily indicate Crimea on maps as Ukrainian territory.
    Photo: Google Maps

Experts at the Washington-based National Geographic Society have announced plans to redraw the world map to show Crimea as part of Russia after the Ukrainian breakaway region's reunification with Moscow is finalized.

The U.S. magazine's editorial, legal and cartographic leadership met Tuesday to discuss how to map Crimea's political status, shortly after Russian President Vladimir Putin and Crimea's leaders signed a treaty on Russia absorbing the Black Sea peninsula.

The historic reunification treaty is expected to be approved by Russia's constitutional court and then ratified by parliament later this week.

Juan Jose Valdes, the organization's geographer, told U.S. News & World Report that National Geographic maps "the world as it is, not as people would like it to be."

"As you can only surmise, sometimes our maps are not received in a positive light by some individuals who want to see the world in a different light," Valdes said.

National Geographic cartographers have agreed to temporarily indicate Crimea on maps as Ukrainian territory with a shading to indicate a special status, similar to how the contested territories of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank are shown.

But following the ratification of the reunification treaty by the Russian parliament the organization plans to include the region as part of Russia, Valdes said.

Crimea, previously an autonomous republic within Ukraine, refused to recognize the legitimacy of the government in Kiev that came to power amid often violent protests last month and sought reunification with Russia instead. The move has sparked the most serious geopolitical showdown between Russia and the West since the end of the Cold War.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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