Sunday, October 26, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Myshkin: A Cozy Place to Burrow

Published: April 2, 2014 (Issue # 1804)



  • Derived from the word myshka, the Russian word for mouse, legend has it that Myshkin was named after a mouse who saved the life of a prince while he was resting on one of the banks of the Volga River.
    Photo: Alexander Strokin / wikimedia commons

  • Human-sized mice roam the streets of Myshkin giving helpful advice to visitors.
    Photo: Jordi Joan Fabrega / flickr

  • Along the quiet streets of Myshkin, one can discover a number of traditional and well-preserved wooden buildings.
    Photo: Alexander Filyuta / wikimedia commons

  • Get your camera ready as you take a stroll down the Volga embankment.
    Photo: Bashinsky / wikimedia commons

  • The town has kept a mixture of Soviet and post-Soviet monuments on display.
    Photo: D. Kudinv / Flickr

MYSHKIN, Yaroslavl region — While Rome might have been saved by geese, this tiny town in the central Yaroslavl region owes its fame and prosperity to a small mouse.

The place name Myshkin is derived from “myshka” — the Russian word for the small rodent. Legend has it that the animal was glorified in the name of the town after it saved the life of a prince who was resting on one of the banks of the Volga River. The prince, Fyodor Mikhailovich Mstislavsky, the founder of one of Russia’s most influential families in the 15th century, was awoken by the mouse darting across his face. Angered at first, the prince then realized that the mouse had saved him from a snake that had been creeping toward him as he slept.

Centuries later, the mouse became the symbol of a revival in the town when local authorities decided to use its unusual name to attract tourists. The international Festival of the Mouse held in 1996 marked the start of a booming local tourism industry.

Today, Myshkin with a population of just under 6,000, boasts the world’s only Museum of the Mouse along with 29 other tourist attractions, eight hotels and an increasing number of visitors from Russia and abroad. In 2012, 165,000 tourists visited the town, or 15,000 more compared to two years earlier, according to a 2013 report by local officials.

Unemployment is hardly an issue here. The population is involved in tourism and they seem to never run out of ideas. You can see a blacksmith pounding out a needle that is supposed to protect you from black magic. A bit farther down the street, a miller’s wife ushers you into her house to treat you to some tea and traditional Russian blini. And of course human-sized mice can be seen walking around the town, ready to play with you and give you useful advice.

What to do if you have two hours

Whatever man-made attractions might impress you in Myshkin, the humble beauty of its nature remains its biggest asset. The town is located on the high bank of the enormous Volga River — a great advantage for the fans of landscapes and views. Take a stroll down the Volga embankment with your camera ready. To get the best vantage point, it is worth climbing the 15-meter-high bell tower of the Assumption Cathedral (Uspenskaya Ploshchad; +7 485 442 1167) just a short walk away from the embankment. You might be asked for a small fee to go up.

The cathedral itself is worth a short tour, too. It is the result of a joint effort of the Italian architect Johannes Manfrini and a group of Russian artists headed by serf Timofei Medvedev who painted the interior. The construction of the church, which began in 1805 and was sponsored by Myshkin residents, did not stop even during Russia’s fight against Napoleon in 1812.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3 ] [4 ] [5 ] [6 ] [7]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



Times Talk